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Oklahoma City Bombing: Why Did It Occur and Who Was Behind It?

Oklahoma City Bombing: Why Did It Occur and Who Was Behind It?

Learn what motivated white right-wing terrorists Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols to commit the Oklahoma City Bombing, which killed 168 people on April 19, 1995. Discover the federal and local clean up efforts and the fate of McVeigh and Nichols.


Oklahoma City Bombing: Why Did It Occur and Who Was Behind It? - HISTORY

There have been multiple scandalous theories attributed to the Clinton family, and one that claims Hillary Clinton is connected to the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing has recently resurfaced on social media.

The post – which displays an aerial image of the destroyed Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building and a photo of Clinton superimposed on it – says: "Reminder: The building in Oklahoma City was blown up and destroyed just 4 days before Hillary Clinton was to be indicted in the Whitewater scandal. All documents lost!"

The meme was flagged as part of Facebook’s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our partnership with Facebook.)

Let’s cut to the chase: There is no evidence to support the suggestion that Clinton, then first lady, was to be indicted in the Whitewater case or had anything to do with the bombing carried out by Timothy McVeigh that killed 168 people on April 19, 1995.

Government officials denied that any documents associated with the case were in the Murrah building, according to a 1995 Washington Post article about conspiracy theories surrounding the event. Moreover, according to a report issued after the bombing, the list of government departments with regional offices housed in the Murrah building did not include the Department of Justice.

The first version of the conspiracy theory, which came about shortly after the bombing, implicated then-President Bill Clinton, saying he orchestrated the bombing to protect himself from the brewing scandal. The 21-Century meme version redirects the blame toward Hillary.

The July 1995 article by the Washington Post detailed many competing conspiracy theories that arose after the bombing, and at one point, discusses one theory that places the blame on President Clinton’s attempts to evade a scandal:


Oklahoma City Bombing: Why Did It Occur and Who Was Behind It? - HISTORY

On April 19, 1993, in Waco Texas the U.S. government incinerated 86 of it's own citizens for the crime of exercising their constitutional rights of freedom of religion, right to bear arms, and freedom of speech. Timothy McVeigh, who had been at the scene to witness some of the events during the preceding 50 day standoff with U.S. troops, witnessed the inferno erupt on television.

Two years later to the day, on April 19, 1995, the Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City was destroyed by a bomb blast. McVeigh was arrested a short time later after being pulled over for driving a car with no license plate and possession of an unlicensed firearm. Several days later he was identified by witnesses as one of two people seen getting out of a Ryder rental truck that was parked in front just before the blast. The other suspect was never identified, and his existence was denied by the government even though he was caught on videotape.

Seven important facts: 1. In April 1995, the Omnibus Counter Terrorism Bill was struggling to get through the US Congress. After the OKC Bombing occurred, the tragedy looked as though it had been tailor-made to rally public support for the tyrannical bill.

2. The morning of the bombing, the ATF office located inside the Murrah building was empty, unheard of at 9 AM on a weekday.

3. Oklahoma Congressman Ernest Istook told a victim in a taped conversation in 1995 that the OKC bombing was a failed a national security operation that used an FBI provocateur associated with a militia.

4. The ATF was already putting out a story that the Murrah Building was bombed "because of Waco" only a few hours after the actual blast and before Tim McVeigh was even arrested.

5. An unexploded bomb was found attached to a gas line inside the building, and a FEMA memo reports at least two additional bombs were found in the Murrah Building. Joe Harp, based on his military explosives experience, identified the additional bombs he saw removed from the building as being military in nature.

6. General Benton K. Partin, USAF (Ret.) stated in his OKC Bombing report to US Congress that "The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, was not caused solely by the truck bomb. The major factor in its destruction appears to have been detonation of explosives carefully placed at four critical junctures on supporting columns within the building."

7. Prior to the OKC bombing US Senator Arlan Specter as well as Clinton's NSC director Anthony Lake had been advocating federal national security operations to stop militias in America. Anthony Lake gave a speech to the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in the Fall of 1994 in which he said the chief cornerstone of government policy was to "pit our society against militias".


THE GOVERNMENT SAID THE ATTACK WAS BECAUSE OF WACO EVEN BEFORE MCVEIGH WAS A SUSPECT

Do you seriously believe that Timothy McVeigh, a supposed rarely employed drifter, virtually broke and alone as the government would have us believe, was able to plan, assemble a sophisticated bomb, and pull off the largest terror attack on American soil up to that time? If one looks at the details of this, one would have to conclude McVeigh was part of a very large conspiracy, involving CIA sponsored domestic and Middle Eastern helpers. The F.B.I.'s refusal to follow up and ignore so many leads went beyond its ordinary incompetence and reeked of treason. McVeigh attorney Stephen Jones, who worked on this case for years, believed McVeigh was just a part of a greater conspiracy. The last thing McVeigh would do is turn over information on co-conspiritors to those he despised.

Also, McVeigh wanted himself seen as someone who fired the first shot that would start a revolution against a government capable of atrocities such as Ruby Ridge and Waco. He wanted to take full credit for the bombing, and did not want to share it with anyone. In his view, this would make him a mythic figure, a martyr for the revolution. The Murrah Building in Oklahoma City was where all of the records of the Waco Seige were being kept. McVeigh was seen with several unidentified individuals, many with middle eastern features in the weeks leading up to the bombing. At the trial, these facts were NOT allowed in as evidence. Also at his trial his sister read a letter from McVeigh to the grand jury in which he told her he was going into the Special Forces Covert Tactical Unit.

Survivor Jane Graham tells of three very suspicious men she saw in the Murrah Building Garage the week prior to the bombing, and was shocked by the FBI's obvious disinterest in the matter. Virgil Steele, an elevator inspector at the scene also saw two additional bombs being removed from the building. Reports of additional bombs were confirmed by the OKC fire department. They used trained explosives sniffing dogs to locate those additional bombs, so not only did the devices found in the Murrah Building have to look enough like real bombs to fool the bomb squad, they had to SMELL LIKE REAL EXPLOSIVES TO THE BOMB SNIFFING DOGS.

A Video of Tim McVeigh from a security camera at a McDonald's in Junction City, along with statements from the Ryder employees who rented the truck, can be seen as proof that McVeigh did not rent the Ryder Truck used in the bombing. McVeigh had been filmed by the security camera at the McDonald's just minutes before the time stamped on the rental agreement, wearing clothes that did not match either of the men seen at the truck rental center.

There is also no plausible explanation of how he traveled the mile and a quarter from McDonald's to the rental agency, carless and alone, without getting soaked in the rain. The three people interviewed agreed John Does 1 and 2 were dry. According to Stephen Jones, McVeigh's first attorney, who had seen the interview transcripts, it took 44 days for the FBI to convince the car rental agency owner that John Doe 1 was Timothy McVeigh. And in the end they did not dare put him on the witness stand, for fear of what might happen under cross examination.

This might explain why the initial description of John Doe I circulated by the FBI referred to a man with "pock-marked skin, fairly stocky" who stood about 5'10", whereas McVeigh was 6' 3" tall, thin as a rail (160 lbs) and had a smooth complexion. The FBI and US Army used national security operation grounds to threaten Army recruiters with court martial if they described publicly the John Doe provocateurs the recruiters had seen with McVeigh in the Murrah building.

Twenty miles away from the blast, seismographs at the University of Oklahoma recorded not one, but two explosive "events" just after 9:00 a.m. on April 19 1995, within ten seconds of each other. The Omniplex Science Center in Oklahoma City recorded the same dual disturbance, the second one stronger than the first. Dr. Charles Mankin, director of the University of Oklahoma Geological Survey, held a press conference shortly after the bombing and told an assembly of journalists that the seismograph readings CLEARLY indicated TWO explosions. Even the news media reported two bomb blasts initially, but later changed their story.

There is a link between the Murrah bombing and the events of 9-11. The 1993 WTC bombing materials had been purchased with the credit card of a US Muslim and an FBI provocateur named Melvin Lattimore. Melvin Lattimore was seen by 4 witnesses in McVeigh's car at the OKC Travelers Aid office adjacent to the Murrah federal building just ONE DAY before the OKC bombing.

Six FBI agents spent 9 months browbeating the 4 witnesses, trying to make them change their story about seeing Lattimore at the Travelers Aid. Lattimore was the roommate of the 20th 9/11 hijacker Zacarias Moussaoui while he attended the Airman flight school in Norman Oklahoma in 2000 and 2001. Lattimore was also the roomate of 9/11 hijackers Al Hazmi and Al Shehhi in Norman Oklahoma. Retired Air Force General Benton K. Partin informed AG Ashcroft in August 2001 of the Travelers Aid story in writing and in person. Yet, not surprisingly, nothing was done by Ashcroft about Lattimore.

There is the strong likelihood of extensive drugging and mind control. It was reported that McVeigh recieved some twelve or more visits by Dr. Louis Jolyon West, the UCLA mind control expert for the CIA who pronounced Jack Ruby insane after he suggested a conspiracy in the JFK assassination. He also was the government psychiatrist who handled Sirhan Sirhan while he awaited trial. Jolly West was infamous for his early use of LSD on unsuspecting victims. He was the head of the CIA's mind-control program known as MKULTRA, and was a pioneer of electronic brain experimentation.

With the numerous sightings of the John Does with middle eastern features along with the known CIA links to middle eastern terrorist organizations, the statements of explosive experts that the truck bomb alone could not have possibly caused the extensive damage that we saw, the numerous witnesses claiming that they saw bombs being taken out of the Murrah building after the explosion, the incredible unlikelihood of McVeigh being able to pull this off without help in powerful places, and along with the FBI admitting they witheld evidence, we see here a web of lies and deceit that was never untangled.

The truth about what happened in Oklahoma City will never be told by the government, or their willing accomplice, the mainstream press. Nor will they feel any pressure to. The federal government admitted in May 2001 that critical pieces of evidence and witnesses were not allowed to be presented at his trial, delaying his execution another month. But the execution went ahead anyway. The murderers of Ruby Ridge and Waco are free and alive, but on June 11, 2001 Timothy McVeigh was put to death by means of lethal injection at the hands of the U.S. government. He was silenced forever, taking the secrets of Oklahoma City with him.

Three months to the day later 9-11 came along with the new laws, new wars, and the new terror that followed. The glaring questions of OKC are now a distant faded memory. And because they got away with this, and 9-11(so far), your government continues to lie, falsely accuse and kill in order to maintain the balance of power. And because we are saddled with an electorate that is more concerned with giving up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety instead of standing up for their constitutional rights, these abuses of power continue to grow.


The Significance of the Oklahoma City Bombing

Twenty years ago, on April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh detonated a massive truck bomb in front of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. This attack, which killed 168 men, women and children and injured hundreds more, remains the worst act of domestic (as opposed to international) terrorism in United States history.

The immediate impact of the bombing was obvious. The attack not only caused death and destruction but created a storm of media coverage covering this “attack on the heartland.” A secondary theme portrayed America’s “lost innocence.”

The fact that the attack was an act of domestic terrorism took the country by surprise. The media covered the bombing intensely not merely because of the enormity and scale of the attack but also because it seemed to represent something new. The most-scrutinized act of terrorism in recent years had been the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, an act of international terrorism, but the attack on the Murrah building was committed by American citizens targeting their own government with a deadliness hitherto un-witnessed.

The media also rediscovered the dangerousness of the extreme right, a topic neglected since the mid-1980s. Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols led reporters to the militia movement, whose ideology the Oklahoma City bombers shared. Stories about the militia movement blanketed the nation.

If the media was playing catch up, so too was law enforcement, which the bombing took by surprise. Indeed, the 1994 edition of Terrorism in the United States, the FBI’s annual report on international and domestic terrorism, had just given short shrift to domestic terrorism in general. The report’s section on domestic terrorism devoted most of its attention to violent acts by left-wing Puerto Rican independence activists and to animal rights and environmental extremists such as the Animal Liberation Front.

In contrast, the report spent only a paragraph describing the terrorist threat from right-wing extremists. It did not even mention the rapidly growing militia and sovereign citizen movements, nor make any reference to the anger generated within right-wing extremist movements by the standoffs at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, in 1992 and Waco, Texas, in 1993. The federal government seemed to have little understanding of the extreme right in the United States at the time of the Oklahoma City bombing.

After the bombing, everything changed. The FBI shifted its priorities, reassigning large numbers of agents to work domestic terrorism cases and hiring many new agents. It significantly expanded the number of Joint Terrorism Task Forces across the country and went to Congress with a lengthy “want” list. The Justice Department funded an anti-terrorist training program for senior state and local law enforcement executives.

The increased scrutiny of right-wing extremist groups and individuals resulted in a large number of arrests of anti-government extremists and white supremacists over the next few years, primarily on weapons, explosives, and conspiracy charges. It turned out that McVeigh and Nichols were hardly alone. When, in 1999, the FBI issued an analysis dubbed Project Megiddo, warning about potential dangers posed by religious and ideological extremists during the turn of the millennium, right-wing extremism was not ignored as it had been five years earlier.

On April 19, 2000, five years to the day after the Oklahoma City bombing, the Oklahoma National Memorial and Museum was officially dedicated, seemingly cementing the tragedy in America’s consciousness. But Edward T. Linenthal, a scholar who wrote about the development of the Memorial in The Unfinished Bombing: Oklahoma City in American Memory, wasn’t sure what the future would bring. Would the Memorial become an enduring part of national memory? Or perhaps, he asked, might “a future terrorist act that inflicts even more death consign Oklahoma City to a less prestigious location on the landscape of violence?”

The Unfinished Bombing debuted in October 2001, just weeks after the September 11, 2001, terror attacks. The horrific events of that day definitively answered Linenthal’s question, the scale and scope of the 9/11 attacks understandably pushing the 1995 bombing from center stage. The 9/11 attacks, by their very destructiveness, helped to relegate the Oklahoma City bombing to a side exhibit in the national memory—to somewhere in the background of Linenthel’s “landscape of violence.” The 9/11 attacks were larger, far more deadly, and committed by a more faceless, harder-to-comprehend enemy, whether defined as Al Qaeda or more broadly as violent Islamic radicals in general.

As swiftly as the public eye had focused on extreme right movements after the Oklahoma City bombing, it now dropped them after September 11. The government, law enforcement and the media all rushed to grapple with the issue of Islamic extremism. Certainly, with a scale of death and destruction much larger than the April 1995 bombing, the 9/11 attacks warranted more attention. Of that, there is no question.

However, the 9/11 attacks, in so completely shifting attention away from Oklahoma City, as opposed to expanding national attention to encompass the dangers of both right-wing extremism and radical Islamism, in a sense appropriated part of the legacy and significance that the Oklahoma City bombing had to offer. It was as if the collective consciousness could only contemplate one terrorist threat at a time, rather than the multiple threats that the nation usually faces.

Even conspiracy theorists, who had built up a cottage industry claiming that the federal government was itself responsible for the Oklahoma City bombing, now transferred those same ideas to the 9/11 attacks with the development of the so-called “9/11 Truth” movement. Moreover, the shift was not temporary but seemingly permanent. Today, a Google search on “9/11 attacks” will return more than 10 times as many results as a search on “Oklahoma City bombing.”

The result of this shift is that the significance of the Oklahoma City bombing, particularly in terms of its service as a warning of the dangers of domestic extremist movements, became somewhat truncated. The September 11 attacks in effect created two types of significance for the bombing: the importance that the bombing has actually had over the past 20 years and the importance that it could have had over these past years.

After all, it is not as if right-wing extremism disappeared after September 11. The history of right-wing extremism from 1995 to the present day has been one of a steady stream of plots, conspiracies, terrorist acts, and hate crimes. The recent history of extremist violence in the United States has in most respects been dominated by right-wing extremists.

To use just one measure, from January 1995 to the present day, the Anti-Defamation League has identified a minimum of 583 murders committed by right-wing extremists (including the Oklahoma City bombing victims) in the United States. This is a figure that greatly surpasses the deaths caused by other domestic extremists (left-wing extremists and anarchists, religious extremists, etc.). Domestic Islamic extremists come in second with 18 deaths and all other extremist movements together contribute a mere handful.

These statistics are not meant to minimize the threat posed by Islamic extremism, either domestic or international, to the United States. Domestic Islamic extremists are responsible for a great many of the terrorist plots and conspiracies of recent years, for example. Foreign terrorist groups use the Internet to inspire violence within the U.S.—and sometimes, as with the Boston Marathon bombing, succeed. Islamic extremism is a very real threat to the United States.

But the statistics do illustrate that American “homegrown violent extremism,” to use a currently popular phrase, is not limited to extremism motivated by radical interpretations of Islam. The anger and hate that generated the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 is still around in 2015—and still dangerous. Indeed, beginning in 2009 a major resurgence of right-wing extremism emerged in the United States, one that has in the past several years generated a large number of violent acts and conspiracies.

The twentieth anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing provides a new opportunity to ensure that its significance does not disappear. What 1995 and 2001 together teach is that the United States faces threats both from abroad and from within its own extremist fringes. Consequently, we must have the wisdom and capability to respond effectively and intelligently to ideological violence stemming from all sources. That would be the most positive way to pay homage to the victims of April 19, 1995.

The twentieth anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing provides a new opportunity to ensure that its significance does not disappear. Share via Twitter Share via Facebook


April 19, 1995 | Timothy McVeigh Bombs Oklahoma City Building

Staff Sergeant Preston Chasteen The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building pictured two days after it was bombed.
Historic Headlines

Learn about key events in history and their connections to today.

On April 19, 1995, a truck bomb exploded outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring 500. It was the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil until the events of Sept. 11, 2001.

Some authorities believed the bombing was retribution for the federal government’s use of force to end the stand-off of the Branch Davidian religious sect that occurred exactly two years earlier. However, as The New York Times reported, “neither the Branch Davidians nor right-wing ‘militia’ groups that have protested the Government’s handling of the Davidians were believed to have the technical expertise to engage in bombings like the one today.” Other authorities suspected that Islamic militants who carried out a similar attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, were behind the attack.

Neither of these hypotheses was correct. The attack was carried out by Timothy McVeigh, an Army veteran and supporter of right-wing militia groups. McVeigh was angered over the government’s actions in Waco and at a similar incident a year earlier in Ruby Ridge, Idaho. He decided to target the Oklahoma Federal building because it was home to multiple federal agencies, including the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, which was involved in Waco.

McVeigh was aided by Terry Nichols and Michael Fortier, two men he had met in the Army who shared similar political views. Mr. Nichols helped McVeigh gather the materials for the bomb and Mr. Fortier helped him survey the building. Though other anti-government activists may have given them support and advice, only McVeigh, Mr. Nichols and Mr. Fortier were charged.

McVeigh was arrested just an hour and a half after the explosion when he was pulled over for operating a vehicle that did not have a license plate. He was charged with carrying a concealed weapon. Authorities found evidence linking McVeigh and Mr. Nichols to the bombing, and McVeigh admitted to his attorneys that he carried out the attack.

McVeigh was put on trial in 1997. He had hoped to present a “necessity defense” in which he would argue that the bombing was necessary to deter the federal government from using force against groups like those in Texas and Idaho. Instead, his defense lawyers focused on raising doubt of his guilt. A jury found McVeigh guilty of murder and conspiracy he was sentenced to death and executed on June 11, 2001. In separate trials, Mr. Nichols was given a life sentence and Mr. Fortier, who testified against McVeigh, received a 12-year sentence.

Connect to Today:

In July 2011, following a shooting attack in Norway by a domestic extremist, Linda Greenhouse wrote in The Times that attacks against a country by its own citizens are often more unsettling than attacks from foreign enemies. She quoted Harvard psychiatrist Robert Coles, who after the Oklahoma City attack told her, “We know this country can handle external enemies, but for one of our own to strike a blow against the federal government, against our own family, is very unnerving, very frightening.”

However, when it comes to defining and legislating against “homegrown” terrorism, a number of questions arise. The controversial and failed Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act of 2007 defines homegrown terrorism as the “use, planned use, or threatened use of force or violence by a group or individual born, raised, or based and operating primarily within the United States or any possession of the United States to intimidate or coerce the United States government, the civilian population of the United States, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives.”

Critics of the bill charge that the definitions are too vague and would permit the government to classify many types of established American political activity, such as civil disobedience, as terrorism. As a 2008 New York Times editorial argued, “Not only do these efforts contradict fundamental American values, it is not clear if they would help fight terrorism.”

In your opinion is there a difference between domestic and foreign-planned terrorism? Do you agree with the premise that acts of terror from “one of our own” are more upsetting, or do you think we should consider both foreign and “homegrown” terrorists under the common umbrella of extremism? What are your thoughts on legislating against people and groups perceived as potential terrorist threats? Why?


The Meaning of the Oklahoma City Bombing Anniversary

W hen a truck bomb blasted through a federal office building in Oklahoma City on a Wednesday morning 20 years ago &mdash April 19, 1995 &mdash it was the deadliest terrorist attack in the history of the nation to that point.

Though fingers pointed many directions in the immediate aftermath, it didn’t take long for investigators to find Timothy McVeigh. As TIME reported in a special issue devoted to the crime &mdash with McVeigh’s face on the cover, alongside the words “The Face of Terror” &mdash only a little more than an hour had passed since the bombing when he was pulled over for a traffic stop and arrested for driving without tags and insurance, and for carrying a concealed weapon. Two days later, the rogue driver was determined to be the same man who was suspected of masterminding the attack.

McVeigh and his accomplices’ possible link to antigovernment organizations immediately drew additional scrutiny to the subject, and offered some insight into the twisted mind that planned such a crime&mdashand why it happened when it did:

Although the Michigan Militia, along with members of other groups, has moved quickly to repudiate any connection with McVeigh or the bombing, the significance of the date on which it took place–April 19–was not lost on those familiar with the patriot movement. Says Ron Cole, a former leader of the Branch Davidian sect who describes himself as a patriot: “It’s a date that has a significance like no other day of the year.” On April 19, 1775, the Battle of Lexington–the opening salvos in America’s Revolutionary War–began. On April 19, 1993, the siege at Waco ended in flames and despair. On April 19, 1995, Richard Wayne Snell, a member of the white supremacist group The Covenant, the Sword and the Arm of the Lord, was executed for the murder of a Jewish businessman and a black police officer. And when Timothy McVeigh rented the Ryder truck, he used a forged South Dakota driver’s license on which the date of issue was listed as April 19, 1993. “He probably meant that he woke up on that day,” says Cole. “I can see his perspective on that.”

In the years since, Oklahoma City has tried to make that date stand for something very different: rather than an example of separatism, they’ve made April 19 a date to remember a community coming together to help one another, living by the idea they call the “Oklahoma Standard.”

Read more from TIME’s special 1995 issue about the bombing, here in the TIME Vault:A Blow to the Heart


The OKC Bombing Coverup Of The Middle East Terrorist Cell

The Oklahoma City terrorist attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building happened on April 19, 1995 killing 168 people, allegedly by a massive homemade bomb concealed in a rental truck in front of the building. Terry Nichols was convicted in a federal court and faced state proceedings. He was sentenced to life imprisonment without parole when the jury deadlocked on the death sentence.

Investigation by NBC Reporter

Investigative reporter, Jayna Davis who worked for the NBC affiliate in Oklahoma City uncovered evidence that Nichols had ties with the terrorist, Osama Bin Laden before the bombing. Timothy McVeigh was also convicted in the case and was put to death on June 11, 2001 at the U.S. Federal Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana. (Link to pdf of WSJ detailed article.)

Jayna Davis says there were other people involved beside Nichols and McVeigh, but when she took her information to the FBI, they wanted to make the bombing of the Murrah Building a domestic terrorist incident only.

When Jayna worked for the Oklahoma City NBC affiliate, she was tasked with finding out others who were involved in the bombing. She said an intelligence source in one of the highest levels in the federal government later confirmed it was a Middle Eastern terrorist cell living and operating in the heart of Oklahoma City just a few miles from the Murrah building.

During the course of her investigation, they found several witnesses that NBC deemed very credible. They testified and told Jayna that they identified an Iraqi national, a former member of Saddam Hussein’s national guard through his own admission later. He said he was in the company of Timothy McVeigh the day of the bombing, and in the passenger seat of the Rider Truck, stepping out of the truck just moments before the blast and speeding away from downtown in a brown Chevrolet pickup that was identified by the FBI as a possible getaway vehicle in an all points bulletin the day of the bombing.

The government never said a word about this third man. They actually said they did not believe there was a foreign connection to the bombing. They had 24 sworn witness identifications that swear there were seven or eight Arab men from the beginning to the day the plot was executed.

Jayna had several police records, court records, and public court documents she had amassed, literally hundreds of documents. She spoke to law enforcement officials, intelligence officials, and terrorist experts…all who confirm the most crucial aspects of the witness testimonies.

McVeigh and Nichols were heavily involved, but according to Jayna’s sources, it was masterminded by Osama Bin Laden. The Writ of Mandamus that was filed just prior to McVeigh’s trial by his defense team that a witness in the Philippines, a member of Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group identified as being funded by Bin Laden, identified Terry Nichols in the presence of Ramzi Yousef, the convicted mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing in 1993, and several of Yousef’s co-conspirators in that bombing. They were discussing bombing activities prior to the OKC bombing. Jayna says that is on the court record.

In September of 1997, Jayna went to the OKC FBI office with an affidavit regarding all the information she wished to turn over to them, along with a notary. The FBI said they had no problem taking it, but that he had to call the legal department. Twenty minutes later he came back and said they had to call the U.S. Attorney’s office in Denver that was handling the bombing case in the trial of Terry Nichols. Jayna’s sworn witness statements implicating others unknown were refused. And that information implicated a middle eastern terrorist cell funded by Osama Bin Laden as assisting Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols in executing the bombing of the Murrah Building. Link

Jayna Davis spent 10 years investigating this bombing. The result is her 2008 book, The Third Terrorist.

The Surveillance State

The shock of the bombing left us wondering why anyone would do such a thing. But there were forces behind the scenes whose agenda called for bringing about the surveillance state. Reportedly, a document to allow surveillance of American citizens was already written, namely the Patriot Act. But the Patriot Act had not yet been presented before Congress. In order to enhance the possibility of its passage the forces involved most likely felt an impetus was needed, something that would cause people to acquiesce, and go along with authorizing spying on Americans in order to “keep them safe.”

The head of the FBI at the time was Louis Freeh and he testified before a Senate Committee and basically said, “We are going to have to watch these people, they might blow-up a federal building.” The people he was referring to were those who would be most unlikely to do such a thing, but needed to be targeted. Those people are the ones whose daily lives involve beliefs and submission to Biblical principles, the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and God given freedoms.

We will probably never fully know what happened that 19 th day in April, 1995, when the Murrah Building was destroyed, but there’s one thing for sure – we know that what was officially reported was not all that really happened, and the surveillance tapes don’t tell it all.

The Ryder Truck Bomb

We know that the Ryder truck fertilizer bomb didn’t actually blow up the building and kill all those people. There had to be planted bombs in the building itself. The building was blown-out not in, and a two and a half or three-foot wall, which was only a few feet away from the Ryder truck, reportedly, wasn’t even disturbed. The bombing lent great impetus to the planned false perception by the public that we had reached a crisis point with domestic terrorism.

McVeigh and Nichols were guilty, but they had a lot of help, and the establishment doesn’t want the American people to know who that help was.

President Clinton aided in preventing the truth about a warning from informant for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Carol Howe, that the Murrah Building could be a target for the next two weeks. It was reported that the reason the warning was ignored was because it named the Murray building, and since no building by that name could be found… it was disregarded and ignored.

The TV News Magazine, Dateline had scheduled a special to bring all this to light, but they were called in to the White House and were admonished not to go ahead with the special. We don’t know what kind of pressure was applied by President Clinton all we know is that the special was dropped. FBI Director Louie Freeh may have been involved, but I believe Attorney General Janet Reno was far more persuasive.

It was reported that a retired Marine colonel, who had completed the investigative work for Dateline, held a press conference bringing to light the cover-up of the truth. He was later fired for revealing the story. The New American Magazine exposed what he told William Jasper, that if he and the New American didn’t continue to bring the facts to light – the American people would never know what happened in Oklahoma City.

Not heeding the warning by Carol Howe was very lame, and it looks as though the ATF, FBI and Janet Reno’s DOJ were looking for an excuse to ignore the warning, and that excuse was supplied by the misspelled name of the building.

The ATF had bomb squads on the scene the morning of the 19 th . It was reported that members of the ATF who were working in the Murrah Building were notified not to come to work on the 19 th . This raises the question about the ATF. Did they have prior knowledge of what was going to happen? Or is this conspiracy theory garbage?

Why did the ATF have bomb squads on the scene prior to the bombing event? What was their purpose? They certainly weren’t there to prevent the bombing. Could it possibly be that they were there to cover-up the facts connected with it?

From various documented reports on the internet, the damage was done by pre-set explosives beneath the part of the building where the daycare was located.

OKC Police Sergeant Yeakey

This was where Sergeant Yeakey of the Oklahoma City Police Department saw something which caused him to become suspicious of what had happened, but we probably will never know what Sergeant Yeakey discovered while he was rescuing people from the rubble at the site, for he was murdered before he had an opportunity to divulge it, although it was called a suicide.

What we do know is that Sergeant Yeakey filed a very lengthy report of eleven pages which the OKC Police Department refused for unknown reasons. They continued to pressure him to change his report to about one page which he refused to do, and considering his death we have to wonder why.

Based upon parts of a letter he sent to a friend, he wasn’t about to waffle on his report. If he did, he wouldn’t be the man he apparently was – a man of integrity, honesty and truth. He was going to stick to his report, come hell or high-water and it cost him his life.

Here is part of his letter:

Knowing what I know now and understanding fully what went down that morning makes me ashamed to wear a badge from Oklahoma City’s Police Department. I took an oath to uphold the law and to enforce the law to the best of my ability. This is something I cannot honestly do and hold my head up proud any longer if I keep my silence as I am ordered to do…

The sad truth of the matter is that they have so many police officers convinced that by covering up the truth about the operation gone wrong, that they are actually doing our citizens a favor. What I want to know is how many other operations have they had that blew up in their faces? Makes you stop and take another look at Waco…

Even if I tried to explain it to you the way it was explained to me and the ridiculous reason for having our own police department falsify reports to their fellow officers, to the citizens of the city and to our country, you would feel the way I do about all this…

The last communication from Sergeant Yeakey was to a friend whom he told that he was on a mission to secure some evidence that he had compiled about the Federal cover-up of the OKC bombing. He said that he was being followed by the Feds and would have to get them of his trail, but then he would return and they (he and his friend) would go to lunch – but he never returned.

According to the report of his supposed suicide, he slashed his wrists and forearms eleven times and his throat twice near the jugular vein. Then, apparently seeking a more private place to die, he crawled another mile of rough terrain away from his car and climbed a fence before shooting himself in the head with a small caliber revolver. What appeared to be rope burns on his neck, hand-cuff bruises on his wrists and muddy grass embedded in his slash wounds strongly indicated that he had some help in traversing this final distance.

Several years ago, I listened to an interview of Tonia Yeakey, his wife, with a news reporter and a former police officer, in which she revealed that someone that knew told her that her husband had been dragged the distance referred to in the above paragraph.

As much as has come to light concerning the OKC bombing, there are still very few people that have any idea what really happened.

Most people continue to think that only Timothy McVeigh was guilty of murdering all those people even though the evidence clearly shows different. People believe Sergeant Yeakey committed suicide because he felt guilty for not being able to rescue more people after the bombing of the Murrah Building. The reason they think this way is because of the lies that were told – all the way to the White House, to cover up the truth.

The OKC bombing is only one example of how the FBI and other federal agencies have consistently been used to cover-up corruption and murder, along with all the connections over the past thirty years.

Corruption in the FBI

Louisiana State Senator John Milkovich recently published a book, “Robert Mueller, Errand Boy for the New World Order” which chronicles the actions of the FBI under Mueller’s leadership from Ruby Ridge, Pan Am 103, 9-11 and much more, which reveals a pattern by the FBI to systematically facilitate and cover-up actions of the guilty and punish the innocent.

Following is a small segment from the book which reveals much about how Mueller operates in carrying out an investigation.

In short, with respect to 9-11, Mueller has not conducted an investigation so much as he has obstructed an investigation. His efforts betray more of an effort to conceal the culpability of the perpetrators than to reveal their culpability. With respect to the attack of 9-11, he has not labored to uncover the truth. He has striven to cover it up. It is difficult to rationally look at his actions and avoid the conclusion that his real motive for constructing a Surveillance State is not to investigate and expose terrorists – but to spy on Americans.

The book is a must read, and can be purchased at the above link or from Amazon. This is the first in a series.


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OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – A North Oklahoma City family is catching their breath after a shooting victim crashed his SUV into their apartment Monday night.

The family that lives at the Village at Stratford Apartments, near Northwest 122nd and Pennsylvania Avenue, told KFOR they want to remain anonymous but did share what happened from their perspective.

The woman who lives there said she had called her sleeping husband at about 9:30 p.m. to bring her some food at work. She’s thanking God because while he was making the delivery, a man slammed into their master bedroom in his Chevy Tahoe.

The family’s two young daughters were sleeping in the bedroom next to it, remaining unhurt.

Oklahoma City Police Department officials reported that Alex Brown was the man who crashed into the building at about 10 p.m. He was bleeding with a gunshot wound to the face. In the SUV with him were a firearm and a large amount of marijuana. He was taken to the hospital.

As of Tuesday night, police haven’t released what led to the shooting or the crash, or even who shot Brown.

As for the family who lives in the apartment, they’ve been given a new apartment to live in at the complex. They’re thankful none of them were hurt and that they have renter’s insurance.

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Timothy McVeigh - Wikipedia

Timothy James McVeigh (April 23, 1968 – June 11, 2001) was an American domestic terrorist who perpetrated the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people and injured over 680 others. The bombing was the deadliest act of terrorism in the United States prior to the September 11 attacks, and remains the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in United States history. Students explore the Oklahoma City Bombing tragedy. In this American terrorism lesson, students discuss the event as a class then use the Internet to read the biographies of the 168 people who died in the bombing. Get Free Access See Review. Lesson Planet. Executing Justice For Teachers 6th - 12th. Students explore the reasons for postponing the execution of Timothy McVeigh, assess key legal.

Netflix New Oklahoma City Bombing Documentary Is An.

When you consider the amount of anti-government hostility in the U.S at the moment, it’s fair to say the events portrayed in Oklahoma City are more relevant than ever… With lies, terror, fake. The new PBS documentary 'Oklahoma City,' about the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, made its world debut Saturday in the “Documentary Premieres” category at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. February 3, including at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art (in-persons. The Murrah Building in Oklahoma City was where all of the records of the Waco Seige were being kept. McVeigh was seen with several unidentified individuals, many with middle eastern features in the weeks leading up to the bombing. At the trial, these facts were NOT allowed in as evidence. Also at his trial his sister read a letter from McVeigh to the grand jury in which he told her he was.

Oklahoma City (2017) - IMDb

Directed by Barak Goodman. With Janet Beck, Alan Berg, Jim Botting, Bill Buford. Documents the beliefs and experiences of Timothy McVeigh in the lead-up to his bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, which claimed 168 lives. Apr 24, 2016 - April 19,1995. Alfred P. Murrah Building. See more ideas about Oklahoma city bombing, Oklahoma city bombing memorial, Oklahoma city.


Oklahoma City Bombing: All the Evidence Points to the U.S. Federal Government

Two years later to the day, on April 19, 1995, the Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City was destroyed by a bomb blast. McVeigh was arrested a short time later after being pulled over for driving a car with no license plate and possession of an unlicensed firearm. Several days later he was identified by witnesses as one of two people seen getting out of a Ryder rental truck that was parked in front just before the blast. The other suspect was never identified, and his existence was denied by the government even though he was caught on videotape.

Seven important facts: 1. In April 1995, the Omnibus Counter Terrorism Bill was struggling to get through the US Congress. After the OKC Bombing occurred, the tragedy looked as though it had been tailor-made to rally public support for the tyrannical bill. 2. The morning of the bombing, the ATF office located inside the Murrah building was empty, unheard of at 9 AM on a weekday.

3. Oklahoma Congressman Ernest Istook told a victim in a taped conversation in 1995 that the OKC bombing was a failed a national security operation that used an FBI provocateur associated with a militia.

4. The ATF was already putting out a story that the Murrah Building was bombed “because of Waco” only a few hours after the actual blast and before Tim McVeigh was even arrested.

5. An unexploded bomb was found attached to a gas line inside the building, and a FEMA memo reports at least two additional bombs were found in the Murrah Building. Joe Harp, based on his military explosives experience, identified the additional bombs he saw removed from the building as being military in nature.

6. General Benton K. Partin, USAF (Ret.) stated in his OKC Bombing report to US Congress that “The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, was not caused solely by the truck bomb. The major factor in its destruction appears to have been detonation of explosives carefully placed at four critical junctures on supporting columns within the building.”

7. Prior to the OKC bombing US Senator Arlan Specter as well as Clinton’s NSC director Anthony Lake had been advocating federal national security operations to stop militias in America. Anthony Lake gave a speech to the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in the Fall of 1994 in which he said the chief cornerstone of government policy was to “pit our society against militias”.

THE GOVERNMENT SAID THE ATTACK WAS BECA– USE OF WACO EVEN BEFORE MCVEIGH WAS A SUSPECT Do you seriously believe that Timothy McVeigh, a supposed rarely employed drifter, virtually broke and alone as the government would have us believe, was able to plan, assemble a sophisticated bomb, and pull off the largest terror attack on American soil up to that time? If one looks at the details of this, one would have to conclude McVeigh was part of a very large conspiracy, involving CIA sponsored domestic and Middle Eastern helpers. The F.B.I.’s refusal to follow up and ignore so many leads went beyond its ordinary incompetence and reeked of treason. McVeigh attorney Stephen Jones, who worked on this case for years, believed McVeigh was just a part of a greater conspiracy. The last thing McVeigh would do is turn over information on co-conspiritors to those he despised. Also, McVeigh wanted himself seen as someone who fired the first shot that would start a revolution against a government capable of atrocities such as Ruby Ridge and Waco. He wanted to take full credit for the bombing, and did not want to share it with anyone. In his view, this would make him a mythic figure, a martyr for the revolution. The Murrah Building in Oklahoma City was where all of the records of the Waco Seige were being kept. McVeigh was seen with several unidentified individuals, many with middle eastern features in the weeks leading up to the bombing. At the trial, these facts were NOT allowed in as evidence. Also at his trial his sister read a letter from McVeigh to the grand jury in which he told her he was going into the Special Forces Covert Tactical Unit.

Survivor Jane Graham tells of three very suspicious men she saw in the Murrah Building Garage the week prior to the bombing, and was shocked by the FBI’s obvious disinterest in the matter. Virgil Steele, an elevator inspector at the scene also saw two additional bombs being removed from the building. Reports of additional bombs were confirmed by the OKC fire department. They used trained explosives sniffing dogs to locate those additional bombs, so not only did the devices found in the Murrah Building have to look enough like real bombs to fool the bomb squad, they had to SMELL LIKE REAL EXPLOSIVES TO THE BOMB SNIFFING DOGS.

A Video of Tim McVeigh from a security camera at a McDonald’s in Junction City, along with statements from the Ryder employees who rented the truck, can be seen as proof that McVeigh did not rent the Ryder Truck used in the bombing. McVeigh had been filmed by the security camera at the McDonald’s just minutes before the time stamped on the rental agreement, wearing clothes that did not match either of the men seen at the truck rental center.

There is also no plausible explanation of how he traveled the mile and a quarter from McDonald’s to the rental agency, carless and alone, without getting soaked in the rain. The three people interviewed agreed John Does 1 and 2 were dry. According to Stephen Jones, McVeigh’s first attorney, who had seen the interview transcripts, it took 44 days for the FBI to convince the car rental agency owner that John Doe 1 was Timothy McVeigh. And in the end they did not dare put him on the witness stand, for fear of what might happen under cross examination.

This might explain why the initial description of John Doe I circulated by the FBI referred to a man with “pock-marked skin, fairly stocky” who stood about 5󈧎”, whereas McVeigh was 6′ 3″ tall, thin as a rail (160 lbs) and had a smooth complexion. The FBI and US Army used national security operation grounds to threaten Army recruiters with court martial if they described publicly the John Doe provocateurs the recruiters had seen with McVeigh in the Murrah building.

Twenty miles away from the blast, seismographs at the University of Oklahoma recorded not one, but two explosive “events” just after 9:00 a.m. on April 19 1995, within ten seconds of each other. The Omniplex Science Center in Oklahoma City recorded the same dual disturbance, the second one stronger than the first. Dr. Charles Mankin, director of the University of Oklahoma Geological Survey, held a press conference shortly after the bombing and told an assembly of journalists that the seismograph readings CLEARLY indicated TWO explosions. Even the news media reported two bomb blasts initially, but later changed their story.

There is a link between the Murrah bombing and the events of 9-11. The 1993 WTC bombing materials had been purchased with the credit card of a US Muslim and an FBI provocateur named Melvin Lattimore. Melvin Lattimore was seen by 4 witnesses in McVeigh’s car at the OKC Travelers Aid office adjacent to the Murrah federal building just ONE DAY before the OKC bombing. Six FBI agents spent 9 months browbeating the 4 witnesses, trying to make them change their story about seeing Lattimore at the Travelers Aid. Lattimore was the roommate of the 20th 9/11 hijacker Zacarias Moussaoui while he attended the Airman flight school in Norman Oklahoma in 2000 and 2001. Lattimore was also the roomate of 9/11 hijackers Al Hazmi and Al Shehhi in Norman Oklahoma. Retired Air Force General Benton K. Partin informed AG Ashcroft in August 2001 of the Travelers Aid story in writing and in person. Yet, not surprisingly, nothing was done by Ashcroft about Lattimore.

There is the strong likelihood of extensive drugging and mind control. It was reported that McVeigh recieved some twelve or more visits by Dr. Louis Jolyon West, the UCLA mind control expert for the CIA who pronounced Jack Ruby insane after he suggested a conspiracy in the JFK assassination. He also was the government psychiatrist who handled Sirhan Sirhan while he awaited trial. Jolly West was infamous for his early use of LSD on unsuspecting victims. He was the head of the CIA’s mind-control program known as MKULTRA, and was a pioneer of electronic brain experimentation.

With the numerous sightings of the John Does with middle eastern features along with the known CIA links to middle eastern terrorist organizations, the statements of explosive experts that the truck bomb alone could not have possibly caused the extensive damage that we saw, the numerous witnesses claiming that they saw bombs being taken out of the Murrah building after the explosion, the incredible unlikelihood of McVeigh being able to pull this off without help in powerful places, and along with the FBI admitting they witheld evidence, we see here a web of lies and deceit that was never untangled.