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USS Omaha CL-4 - History

USS Omaha CL-4 - History

USS Omaha CL-4

Omaha II (CL-4: dp. 7, 050; 1. 555'6"; b. 55'4"; dr. 20'10"; s. 34.7 k.; cpl. 458; a. 12 6", 4 3", 6 21" tt.; cl. Omaha)

Omaha (CL~4) was laid down 6 December 1918 by the Todd SB ~ DD Co., Tacoma, Wash., launched 14 December 1920; sponsored by Miss Louise Bushnell White, and commissioned 24 February 1923, Capt. David C. Hanrahan in command.

Following her commissioning, Omaha joined the Atlantic Fleet under peace time conditions. At this time her primary mission was training, and she proved to be very capable by consistently winning fleet awards in gunnery and eommunieations. She made many ports-of-call throughout the Mediterranean and Caribbean during her peacetime cruises, displaying the Stars and Stripes.

Just prior to the U. S. entry into World War II, on 6 November 1941, while on neutrality patrol with Somers (DD-381) in mid-Atlantic near the Equator, Omaha sighted a vessel which aroused much suspicion by her actions. Refusing to satisfactorily identify herself, and taking evasive actions, the stranger was ordered to heave to. She flew the American flag and carried the name Willmoto of Philadelphia on her stern.

As Omaha's crew dispatched a boarding party, the freighter's crew took to life boats and hoisted a signal which indicated that the ship was sinking. When the Omaha party pulled alongside they could hear explosions from within the hull, while one of the fleeing crewmen shouted "This is a German ship and she is sinking." In short order the men of the Omaha, in spite of extreme dangers, had salvaged the vessel, rendered her safe and had her underway for Puerto Rico. The freighter, as it turned out, was the German ship Oder~wld, and her capture was one of the great dramas of American seamanship.

After the United States entered the war, Omaha continued her South Atlantic patrol, instructed to stop Nazi blockade runners. While patrolling out of a base in Brazil, on 4 January 1944, with Jouett (I)D-396), she spotted a ship which immediately showed signs of being scuttled. The ship's crew took to the boats and she began settling by the stern. The following day another ship was sighted and its crew set her afire. Oma7u~ opened fire and the vessel disappeared beneath the waves. Both ships carried cargos of rubber which the Germans desperately needed.

In March, Omaha proceeded to Naples to prepare for landings in Southern France. On 19 August she protected the flank of the units bombarding Toulon, and three days later took part in the operations that resulted in the surrender of the German garrison on the island of Porquerolles.

Omaha was present at the surrender of Giens on 23 August, and on the 25th she delivered a sustained bombardment on targets in the Toulon area. Shortly thereafter she was detached from the operation and returned to patrol duties. The termination of hostilities (15 August 1945) found her patrolling in the South Atlantic.

Omaha sailed for Philadelphia upon detachment from patrol, arriving 1 September. By 17 October she was slated for retirement, and she decommissioned 1 November 1945. Omaha was struck from the Naval Register 28 November 1945, and scrapped in February 1946 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
Omaha earned one battle star for service in World War II.


USS Omaha (CL 4)

Decommissioned 1 November 1945.
Stricken 28 November 1945.
Scrapped in February 1946 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Commands listed for USS Omaha (CL 4)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Paulus Prince Powell, USN1 Sep 193915 Oct 1941
2Capt. Theodore Edson Chandler, USN15 Oct 19411 Apr 1943
3Capt. Charles Doyle Leffler, Jr., USN1 Apr 194310 Mar 1944
4T/Capt. Elwood Morse Tillson, USN10 Mar 194423 Jun 1945
5T/Capt. William Langfitt Freseman, USN23 Jun 194524 Sep 1945

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USS Omaha CL-4 - History

USS Omaha , first of a ten-ship class of 7050-ton light cruisers, was built at Tacoma, Washington. Commissioned in February 1923, she served in both the Atlantic and Pacific areas during the seventeen peacetime years that followed, often as a flagship, and made a cruise to the Mediterranean Sea during the later 1930s. After the outbreak of World War II in Europe in September 1939, Omaha participated in Neutrality Patrols in the Atlantic. While so engaged near the Equator on 6 November 1941, she participated in the capture of the German blockade runner Odenwald , which had disguised herself as the U.S. merchant ship Willmoto .

Once the United States formally entered the Second World War in December 1941 Omaha continued her South Atlantic operations. Based in Brazil with other cruisers and destroyers of what came to be called the Fourth Fleet, she took part in surveys of possible base sites and actively searched for Axis commerce raiders and blocade runners. On 4 and 5 January 1944, while serving as flagship of Task Force 41, Omaha and her companion destroyer, USS Jouett (DD-396), intercepted two German blockade runners, Rio Grande and Burgenland . Both enemy ships were sunk and their survivors rescued.

During August 1944, Omaha participated in the invasion of Southern France, firing her guns against targets ashore in the Toulon area. After the conclusion of that operation she returned to her South Atlantic beat and remained on duty there until Japan capitulated in August 1945. Decommissioned in November 1945, USS Omaha was scrapped at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1946.

This page features selected views of USS Omaha (CL-4).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

In harbor, 8 December 1923.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 92KB 740 x 610 pixels

Passing the San Diego Naval Station, circa 1925-1926.
Note the F5L seaplanes in the foreground.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 575 pixels

Underway, circa the early 1930s.
The original photograph is dated 20 October 1936, but it was actually taken prior to Omaha 's 1933 overhaul, during which her topmasts were reduced and a "bathtub" machinegun platform was fitted atop her foremast.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 127KB 740 x 605 pixels

Off the New York Navy Yard, 10 February 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 68KB 740 x 510 pixels

In New York Harbor, 10 February 1943.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 114KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

View of the ship's forward superstructure, taken after overhaul at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, 29 August 1933.
Note newly installed machine gun "bathtub" atop Omaha foremast, rangefinders and other fire control facilities on and about the mast, voice tubes running down from the masthead, 6"/53 guns in casemate mountings, and Battle Efficiency "E" painted on the pilothouse.

Courtesy of Don S. Montgomery, USN (Retired).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 83KB 600 x 725 pixels

Aground in the Bahamas, 18 July 1937.
Note lighthouse at right and vessels alongside Omaha .

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 69KB 740 x 600 pixels

Ship's Commanding Officer, Captain Wallace L. Lind (3rd from left, seated) with some of her officers and men, while Omaha was serving in the Mediterranean Sea, circa 1938-1939.
Commander Norman C. Gillette, Omaha 's Executive Officer, is seated in the center, just to right of Captain Lind.
The ship's forward twin 6"/53 gun turret is just behind the men.

Collection of Commodore Norman C. Gillette, USN.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 111KB 740 x 565 pixels

Odenwald Incident, November 1941

USS Omaha (CL-4), in right center, standing by the German blockade runner Odenwald , which has a U.S. boarding party on board, in the South Atlantic, 6 November 1941.
Photographed from USS Somers (DD-381).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 71KB 740 x 610 pixels

Odenwald Incident, November 1941

Crewmembers of USS Omaha (CL-4) pose with U.S. and German flags, on board the captured German blockade runner Odenwald , in the South Atlantic.
Life rings are present bearing the names Odenwald of Hamburg, and Willmoto of Philadelphia. The German ship had attempted to disguise herself as the Willmoto , an American-flag merchant steamer.
Odenwald was captured by Omaha and USS Somers (DD-381) on 6 November 1941. This photograph is dated 18 November 1941.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 126KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

First Lady Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
(standing, upper right center)

Addresses the crew of USS Omaha (CL-4), April 1944.
Standing beside her, to the left, is Rear Admiral Oliver M. Read, USN, Commander Surface Patrol Force (Task Force 41), Fourth Fleet.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 109KB 535 x 765 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Photographed from USS Philadelphia (CL-41), during the landings in Southern France, August 1944.
In the distance are (from left to right): a French Navy destroyer, a French light cruiser, and USS Augusta (CA-31).
Note SOC seaplanes on Philadelphia 's starboard catapult and hangar hatch cover.


US Navy warship ‘swarmed by 14 spherical UFOs going 160mph’ in chilling leaked video of radar screen from USS Omaha

A CHILLING video appears to show a US Navy warship being swarmed by 14 "spherical" UFOs travelling at up to 160mph.

The video was leaked to Jeremy Corbell, a documentary film maker, who has been behind a recent string of UFO footage.

Corbell posted the clip on his Instagram to his 200,000 followers. showing the USS Omaha's radar screen with audible chatter in the background from the crew.

Numerous objects can be seen swarming across the green and black screen in the ship's combat information centre.

He explained the July 15, 2019, encounter off the coast of San Diego lasted two hours from 9pm to 11pm and ended when one of the 6ft objects plunged into the ocean.

No wreckage was ever recovered from the scene when a US submarine went to investigate.

The documentary maker, who runs website Extraordinary Beliefs, claims still images from this footage were included in a briefing to the US's UFO task force.

It is claimed the unknown objects - which are said to have been described as "spherical" - were hitting speeds of up to 158mph.

"138 knots. Holy s***. They’re going fast. Oh, it’s turning around," exclaims one of the crew from off screen.

Mr Corbell said: "We do not know what, if anything, the Navy or Pentagon might be willing to say about the USS Omaha incident (and related UAP encounters), but we are confident the incident is a legitimate mystery - and look forward to whatever information might be forthcoming."

The footage appears to be from the same incident as a previous video leak which shows a spherical UFO appearing to plunge into the ocean.

UFOs - now more commonly referred to in scientific and intelligence circles as Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) - have stepped from being fringe conspiracy theories to a genuine security concern.

And so far there are no public answers as to what appears to be happening in our skies.

However, US officials have started taking the unprecedented step of confirming the authenticity of videos filmed by warships and warplanes of their strange encounters.

And they have admitted they do not know the origin of the strange objects as calls grow in the US for widespread disclosure to figure out what - if anything - the world's governments are hiding on UFOs.

US intelligence services officially closed the book on the phenomena in 1969 at the conclusion Project Blue Book - which stated there was nothing to see regarding UFOs.

However, in the last three years there has been an abrupt turnaround as the Pentagon took the unprecedented step of releasing three stunning UFO videos filmed by the US Navy.

And it also confirmed the existence of its secretive UFO investigation unit, before the US Senate then commissioned a report on the issue from intelligence chiefs.

The Director of National Intelligence's office, the highest intelligence body in the US, was given 180 days to compile the dossier - with the deadline expiring in June.

US Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican who sits on the intelligence committee, is being one of the biggest driving forces - encouraging the US not to "laugh off" the historically stigmatizing phenomena.

Competing theories on the strange videos continue to rage – with some grounded on Earth claiming the videos capture never-before-seen military aircraft or drones, while others claim it shows otherworldly craft possibly piloted by aliens.

Others however are more skeptical and sometimes even dismissive, claiming the bizarre videos may just be camera tricks, natural phenomena or even outright hoaxes.

What is going on with UFOs in the US?

UFOS have stepped from fringe conspiracy theories to a genuine national security debate in the US.

Pentagon officials last year took the unprecedented step to release of trio of remarkable videos which showed US encounters with UFOs.

The debate is still open as to what the phenomena caught on film were – but it made clear to everyone, something is in the skies.

Perhaps the most striking was a video known as the “Tic Tac” – which showed an unidentified object being pursued by fighter planes.

The US also confirmed the existence of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) – a Pentagon programme set up to study UFOs before being disbanded in 2017.

However, it was replaced by the UAP Task Force in June 2020 after a vote by the US Senate Intelligence Committee.

Defence chiefs have since confirmed a number of leaked UFO videos and photos which were submitted to the Task Force for investigation.

Why this sudden rush for transparency?

No outside the secretive wings of the US government currently knows for sure.

And as a tacked on addendum to a 5,500 page Covid relief bill passed in December, the the Director of National Intelligence’s office was ordered to compile a report on UFOs within 180 days.

Former intelligence director John Ratcliffe has hinted the report will be a big deal – and we now just over a month away from its release.

The five month deadline elapses on in June, with some UFO lobbyists claiming it could be the “most profound moment in human history“.

Perhaps one of the most extraordinary interventions on UFOs came from former US President Barack Obama who sensationally addressed the topic on CBS.

He said: "What is true, and I’m actually being serious here, is that there’s footage and records of objects in the skies, that we don’t know exactly what they are, we can’t explain how they moved, their trajectory

"They did not have an easily explainable pattern. And so, you know I think that people still take seriously trying to investigate and figure out what that is.

"But I have nothing to report to you today."

His comments have only fueled the new desire for openness on the topic of UFOs, with one expert telling The Sun Online he believes "powerful forces" are at work behind the scenes.

Nick Pope, a former UFO investigator for the UK's Ministry of Defence, told The Sun Online the world may never know why the Pentagon has done a U-turn after decades of denial on unidentified phenomena.

"Beyond a shadow of a doubt, there is a sort of hidden strategic agenda here that Congress, the media and the public do not yet understand - and may never understand," the investigator said.

"Something is playing out right now, powerful forces are at work behind the scenes, pulling the strings on this."

He added: "There could be something about the phenomena which is just going to be undeniable very shortly and this is the US government trying to get out ahead of the story and drive the narrative."


  • Destroyers
      - 2x1 Bofors 3.9" guns, 2x1 21" torpedo tubes - A lucky and famous little ship!
    • from Recognition Journal as of Sep43 and (for the Rudderow/Butler/Samuel B. Roberts DEs) from ONI 222 as of 1945.
    • Battleships (BB)
      • Old Battleships, as of 1943
          - 6x2 12" guns, see notes for secondaries - 5x2 14" guns, see notes for secondaries - 2x2, 2x3 14" guns, 8x2 5" dual purpose guns - 4x3 14" guns, 8x2 5" dual purpose guns - 4x3 14" guns, see notes for secondaries - 4x3 14" guns, 8x2 5" guns - 4x2 16" guns, 18x1 5" guns
        • - 3x3 16" guns, 10x2 5" guns - with photo - 3x3 16" guns, 8(or 10)x2 5" guns - with photo - 3x3 16" guns, 10x2 5" guns - with photo
      • - 90+ aircraft - with photo - 100+ aircraft - with photo - 1:1800 "2-D model" - 35 aircraft - with photos - 45 aircraft - with photos - 30 aircraft - with photos
        - 3x3 12" guns, 6x2 5" guns - with photos
      • Northampton class Heavy Cruisers, 1942 and 1945 (CA) - 3x3 8" guns, 8x1 5" guns - with photos - 3x3 8" guns, 8x1 5" guns - with photos - 3x3 8" guns, 8x1 5" guns - with photos (CA) - 3x3 8" guns, 6x2 5" guns - with photo (CL) - 4x3 6" guns, 6x2 5" guns - with photo (CL) - 5x3 6" guns, 8x1 5" guns - with photos (CL) - 5x3 6" guns, 4x2 5" guns - with photos (CL) - 2x2, 6x1 6" guns, 8x1 3" guns - with photo - 8x2 and then 6x2 5" guns. (CL) - 6x2 6" dual purpose guns, many twin 3" guns - with photos
        - 4x1 5" guns, 4x4 21" torpedo tubes - with photos - 5x1 5" guns, 2x5 21" torpedo tubes - with photos - 3x2 5" guns, 2x5 (Gearings, 1x5) 21" torpedo tubes - with photos
      • Small Sideview Drawings of Imperial Japanese Navy Warships:
      • Battleships
          - 4x2 14" guns - 6x2 14" guns, 16x1 6" guns, 4x2 5" guns - 4x2 16" guns
        • - 3x2 8" guns, 4x1 4.7" guns, 2x4 24" torpedo tubes - 5x2 8" guns, 4x1 or 4x2 4.7" guns, 4x4 24" torpedo tubes - 5x2 8" guns, 4x2 4.7" guns, 4x3 24" torpedo tubes - 2x2,2x1 5.5" guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - 7x1 5.5" guns, 4x2 21" torpedo tubes
        • Asashio class Super Destroyers - 3x2 5" guns, 2x4 24" reloadable torpedo tubes - 3x2 5" guns, 3x3 24" reloadable torpedo tubes
        • The old Wakatake and Minekaze class Destroyers - 3x1 4.7" guns, 2x2 21" torpedo tubes and 4x1 4.7" guns and 3x2 21" torpedo tubes
          - (591' long, 74' beam) - (503+' long, 65' beam) - (456' long, 58' beam) - (508' long, 62' beam
        • Small Sideview Drawings of Royal Navy Warships:
        • Battleships and Battle Cruisers
            - 4x2 15" guns, 10x2 4.5" guns - 4x2 15" guns, various smaller - 4x2 15" guns, various smaller - 4x2 15" guns, various smaller - 3x2 15" guns, various smaller
          • - 4x2 6" guns, 4x2 4" guns, 2x4 21" torpedo tubes - 4x2 6" guns, 4x2 4" guns, 2x4 21" torpedo tubes - 5x2 5.25" guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - New, 11Jun09
            - standard armament: 3x2 4.7" guns, 1x2 4" dual purpose guns, 1x4 2 pdr pom pom antiaircraft guns, 1x4 21" torpedo tubes - standard armament: 3x2 4.7" guns, 1x1 4" antiaircraft gun, quad antiaircraft pom pom, 1x4 21" torpedo tubes - initial armament: 5x1 4.7" guns, 1x1 3" antiaircraft gun, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - later reduced for more antiaircraft and antisubmarine weapons. - initial armament: 4x1 4.7" guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - later reduced for more antiaircraft and antisubmarine weapons. - standard armament: 3x2 4" guns, quad antiaircraft pom pom - New, 17May10
            : Roberts Monitor, Hunt Types 1-4 Escort Destroyers, etc.
          • Small Sideview Drawings of Kriegsmarine Warships:
          • Battleships
              - 4x2 15" guns, 6x2 5.9" guns, 8x2 4.1" AA guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes
              - 3x3 11" guns, 4x1+4x2 5.9" guns, 7x2 4.1" AA guns
            • - never completed
              - 2x3 11" guns, 8x1 5.9" guns, 3x2 3.5" guns, 2x4 21" torpedo tubes - Same as Luetzow
              - 4x2 8" guns, 6x2 3.5" guns, 4x3 21" torpedo tubes - Same as for Hipper - 3x3 5.9" guns, 3x2 3.5" AA guns, 4x3 21" torpedo tubes - 3x3 5.9" guns, 4x2 3.5" AA guns, 4x3 21" torpedo tubes - 3x3 5.9" guns, 3x2 3.5" guns, 4x3 21" torpedo tubes
              - 5x1 5" guns, 4x2 21" torpedo tubes classes - 5x1 5" guns, 4x2 21" torpedo tubes - 4x1 5.9" guns, 4x2 21" torpedo tubes
              - 2x1 4.1" guns
              Battleships
                - 2x3,2x2 12.6" guns, 6x2 4.7" guns - 2x3,2x2 12.6" guns, 4x3 5.3" guns
                - 4x2 8" guns, various smaller, no torpedo tubes. - 4x2 8" guns, 6x2 3.9" guns, 4x2 21" torpedo tubes - 4x2 8" guns, 8x2 3.9" guns, 4x2 21" torpedo tubes - 4x2 6" guns, 3x2 3.9" guns, 2x2 21" torpedo tubes - 4x2 6" guns, 3x2 3.9" guns, 2x2 21" torpedo tubes - 2x2, 2x3 (10) 6" guns, 4x2 3.9" guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - 4x2 5.3" guns, 2x4 21" torpedo tubes
                - 3x2 4.7" guns, 2x2(or3) 21" torpedo tubes
                - 3x1 4" guns, 4x1 18" torpedo tubes
                Battleships
                  - 4x3 12" guns, others as shown - Revised, 19Jul09
                  - 3x3 7.1" guns, 8x1 2.9" guns 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - New, 22Jul09 - 5x1 5.1" guns, 2x4 21" torpedo tubes - New, 19Jul09
                  Battleship and Battle Cruisers
                    - 2x4 15" guns, 3x3" guns, 6x2 3.9" antiaircraft guns - 2x4 13" guns, 3x4, 2x2 5.1" guns, assorted antiaircraft guns - 2x4 13" guns, 3x4, 2x2 5.1" guns, assorted antiaircraft guns
                    - 4x2 8" guns, 6x2 3.9" dual purpose guns, 2x3 21.7" torpedo tubes - 4x2 8" guns, 6x2 3.9" dual purpose guns, 2x3 21.7" torpedo tubes - 4x2 8" guns, 6x2 3.9" dual purpose guns, 2x3 21.7" torpedo tubes - 3x3 6.1" guns, 4x2 3.5" guns, 2x2 21.7" torpedo tubes - 4x2 6.1" guns, 4x1 3" guns, 4x3 21.7" torpedo tubes - 4x2 6.1" guns, 4x1 3" guns, 4x3 21.7" torpedo tubes
                    - 4x1 5.1" guns, 1x4, 2x3 21.7" torpedo tubes - 5x1 5.4" guns, 1x4, 2x3 21.7" torpedo tubes - 4x2 5.1" guns, 1x3, 2x2 21.7" torpedo tubes - 3x2 5.1" guns, 1x3, 2x2 21.7" torpedo tubes
                    Battleships
                      - 2x2 11" guns, 6x1 6" guns - New, 12May10
                      - 2x2, 2x1 6" guns, 1x2, 2x1 3" guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - New, 12May10
                      - 3x1 4.7" guns, 2x3 21" torpedo tubes - New, 12May10

                    NOTES:
                    I have the basic FM 30-50/NAVAER 00-80V-57 Recognition Pictorial Manual of Naval Vessels volume, of course, as well as its Supplement No. 1 which contains the large scale plans for the British cruisers and destroyers.
                    The late war German destroyer and torpedoboat and (all the) Soviet plans were found in the July 1, 1950 ONI 200 manual. (Many of the lighter German ships had been awarded to the Soviets and French as war reparations.)
                    I finally found a good quality plan of the SIMS class destroyer in my recently acquired copy of ONI 54, although that may have been inserted as a supplement, in which case I have no idea when or where it was distributed.
                    I also have the late war ONI manual for ALL the Japanese merchant ships -- most having drawings. (The early war edition I interlibrary loaned from MIT lacked drawings for most ships.)
                    I have the presentation version of the ONI manual for Japanese warships, having photos of models taken from different angles, to facilitate recognition by aviators as well as gunnery officers. Those would be much too space-consuming, though.
                    I have gotten a complete copy of the 1943 ONI manual for Italian warships. Unhappily, it omitted the Trieste/Trento heavy cruisers and early/weak Colleoni class light cruisers: they had already been sunk! However, an ONI page for Trieste/Trento popped up in an otherwise incomplete set.
                    I also have the little 1941 War Department recognition booklets for the U.S., British, and French, but those appear to have been little more than reprintings of Jane's drawings which weren't sufficiently accurate.
                    I also picked up a Luftwaffe August 1940 Englische und franzoesische Kriegsschiffe identification book produced by Mittler and Son in Berlin. It too only used Jane's drawings, although presciently cited Hood's weak armor the year before Denmark Straits.

                    And now, 5Jan12, I have at some expense acquired an original ONI 203, French Naval Vessels, Feb43. Although I finally have the ONI plans for both battle cruisers Dunkerque and Strasbourg and heavily armored heavy cruiser Algerie, ONI 203 is disappointing: the only deck and side plans for destroyers were for the Simoun class, and I was hoping for finally having some for the Mogador/Volta and LeHardi heavy and late construction classes. I suspect the scuttling of the French fleet in Toulon in Nov42 removed the need for a more comprehensive coverage in Feb43. Fortunately, there are such plans for the Suffren and Tourville heavy(?) cruiser classes in the 1950 ONI 200, but still .


                    USS Omaha (CL-4), Omaha-class Light Cruiser

                    USS Omaha (CL-4), in New York Harbor, 10 February 1943.

                    Namesake: City of Omaha, Nebraska

                    21 February 1919 (supplementary contract)

                    Builder: Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co., Tacoma, Washington

                    Cost: $1,541,396 (cost of hull & machinery)[1]

                    Laid down: 6 December 1918

                    Launched: 14 December 1920

                    Sponsored by: Louise Bushnell White

                    Commissioned: 24 February 1923

                    Decommissioned: 1 November 1945

                    ICS November.svgICS India.svgICS Sierra.svgICS Lima.svg

                    awards: Bronze-service-star-3d.png 1 × battle star

                    Fate: Scrapped in February 1946

                    General characteristics (as built)[2][3]

                    Class & type: Omaha-class light cruiser

                    Displacement: 7,050 long tons (7,163 t) (standard)

                    Draft: 14 ft 3 in (4.34 m) (mean)

                    90,000 ihp (67,000 kW) (Estimated power produced on trials)

                    4 × Westinghouse reduction geared steam turbines

                    33.7 knots (62.4 km/h 38.8 mph) (Estimated speed on trials)

                    Crew: 29 officers 429 enlisted (peace time)

                    2 × twin 6 in (152 mm)/53 caliber

                    8 × single 6 in (152 mm)/53 caliber

                    2 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 caliber guns anti-aircraft

                    6 × triple 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes

                    4 × twin 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes

                    224 × mines (removed soon after completion)

                    Conning Tower: 1 1⁄2 in (38 mm)

                    Bulkheads: 1 1⁄2–3 in (38–76 mm)

                    Aircraft carried: 2 × floatplanes

                    General characteristics (1945)[4]

                    2 × twin 6 in (152 mm)/53 caliber

                    6 × single 6 in (152 mm)/53 caliber

                    8 × 3 in (76 mm)/50 caliber anti-aircraft guns

                    6 × triple 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes

                    3 × twin 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors guns

                    14 × single 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon cannons

                    USS Omaha (CL-4) was the lead ship of Omaha-class light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. She was the second US Navy ship named for the city of Omaha, Nebraska. She spent most of her career in the Atlantic. At this time her primary mission was training, and she proved to be very capable by consistently winning fleet awards in gunnery and communications. She made many ports-of-call throughout the Mediterranean and Caribbean during her peacetime cruises, displaying the Stars and Stripes. Later she was assigned to Neutrality Patrol, during which she captured the German blockade runners Odenwald. She also supported Operation Dragoon, the invasion of the south of France.

                    1 Construction and design

                    Omaha was laid down on 6 December 1918 by the Todd SB & DD Co. of Tacoma, Washington.[5] The ship was launched on 14 December 1920 and was sponsored by Louise Bushnell White. She was commissioned on 24 February 1923, with Captain David C. Hanrahan in command.[2]

                    Omaha was 550 feet (170 metres) long at the waterline with an overall length of 555 feet 6 inches (169.32 metres), her beam was 55 feet 4 inches (16.87 metres) and a mean draft of 13 feet 6 inches (4.11 metres). Her standard displacement was 7,050 long tons (7,160 t) and 9,508 long tons (9,661 t) at full load.[3][6] Her crew, during peace time, consisted of 29 officers and 429 enlisted men.[4][7]

                    Omaha was powered by four Westinghouse geared steam turbines, each driving one screw, using steam generated by 12 Yarrow boilers. The engines were designed to produce 90,000 indicated horsepower (67,000 kW) and reach a top speed of 35 knots (65 km/h 40 mph).[3] She was designed to provided a range of 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km 12,000 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h 12 mph), but was only capable of 8,460 nautical miles (15,670 km 9,740 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h 12 mph)[6]

                    Omaha's main armament went through many changes while she was being designed. Originally she was to mount ten 6-inch (150 mm)/53 caliber guns two on either side at the waist, with the remaining eight mounted in tiered casemates on either side of the fore and aft superstructures. After America's entry into World War I the US Navy worked alongside the Royal Navy and it was deceided to mount four six-inch/53 caliber guns in two twin gun turrets fore and aft and keep the eight guns in the tiered casemates so that she would have an eight gun broadside and, due to limited arcs of fire from the casemate guns, four to six guns firing fore or aft. Her secondary armament consisted of two 3-inch (76 mm)/50 caliber anti-aircraft guns in single mounts.[8] [9]Omaha was initially built with the capacity to carry 224 mines, but these were removed early in her career to make way for more crew accommodations.[10] She also carried two triple and two twin, above-water, torpedo tube mounts for 21-inch (533 mm) torpedoes. The triple mounts were fitted on either side of the upper deck, aft of the aircraft catapults, and the twin mounts were one deck lower on either side, covered by hatches in the side of the hull.[6]

                    The ship lacked a full-length waterline armor belt. The sides of her boiler and engine rooms and steering gear were protected by 3 inches (76 mm) of armor. The transverse bulkheads at the end of her machinery rooms were 1.5 inches (38 mm) thick forward and three inches thick aft. The deck over the machinery spaces and steering gear had a thickness of 1.5 inches. The gun turrets were not armored and only provided protection against muzzle blast and the conning tower had 1.5 inches of armor.[9] Omaha carried two floatplanes aboard that were stored on the two catapults. Initially these were probably Vought VE-9s, but the ship operated Curtiss SOC Seagulls from 1935 and Vought OS2U Kingfishers after 1940.[11]

                    During her career Omaha went through several armament changes, some of these changes were save weight, but others were to increase her AA armament. The lower torpedo tube mounts proved to be very wet and were removed, and the openings plated over, before the start of World War II. Another change made before the war was to increase the 3-inch (76 mm) guns to eight, all mounted in the ship's waist. After 1940 the lower aft 6-inch (150 mm) guns were removed and the casemates plated over for the same reason as the lower torpedo mounts.[8] The ship's anti-aircraft armament were originally augmented by three quadruple 1.1 in (28 mm)/75 gun mounts by early 1942, however, these didn't prove reliable and were replaced by twin 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors guns later in the war. At about the same time, Omaha also received 14 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon cannons.[4]

                    Following her commissioning, Omaha joined the Atlantic Fleet in peacetime. At this time, her primary mission was training, and she proved to be very capable by consistently winning fleet awards in gunnery and communications. She made many ports of call throughout the Mediterranean and Caribbean during her peacetime cruises, displaying the US flag.

                    Just prior to the US entry into World War II, on 6 November 1941, while on neutrality patrol with Somers in the mid-Atlantic near the equator, Omaha sighted a vessel which aroused much suspicion by her actions. Refusing to satisfactorily identify herself, and taking evasive action, the stranger was ordered to heave to. She flew the American flag and carried the name Willmoto of Philadelphia on her stern.

                    Omaha crew members posing on the deck of the Odenwald[12]

                    As Omaha's crew dispatched a boarding party to the freighter, its crew took to lifeboats and hoisted a signal which indicated that the ship was sinking. When their party pulled alongside, they could hear explosions from within the hull, while one of the fleeing crewmen shouted "This is a German ship and she is sinking!" In short order, the men of Omaha – despite the extreme risk – salvaged the vessel, rendered her safe and had her underway for Puerto Rico. The "American freighter Wilmoto", as it turned out, was the German freighter Odenwald carrying a cargo of rubber.

                    Odenwald was taken to Puerto Rico. An admiralty court ruled that since the ship was illegally claiming American registration, there was sufficient grounds for confiscation. A legal case was started claiming that the crews of the two American ships had salvage rights because Odenwald's crew attempting to scuttle the ship was the equivalent of abandoning her. The court case – settled in 1947 – ruled the members of the boarding party and the prize crew were entitled to $3,000 apiece while all the other crewmen in Omaha and Somers were entitled to two months’ pay and allowances. This was the last prize money awarded by the US Navy.[13]

                    After the United States entered the war, Omaha continued her South Atlantic patrol, instructed to stop German blockade runners. While patrolling out of a base in Brazil on 4 January 1944, with Jouett, she spotted a ship which immediately showed signs of being scuttled. The ship's crew took to the boats and she began settling by the stern. The following day, another ship was sighted and its crew set her afire. Omaha opened fire and the vessel disappeared beneath the waves. Both ships carried cargoes of rubber, which the Germans desperately needed.

                    In March, Omaha proceeded to Naples to prepare for landings in southern France. On 19 August, she protected the flank of the units bombarding Toulon, and three days later took part in the operations that resulted in the surrender of the German garrison on the island of Porquerolles.

                    Omaha was present at the surrender of Giens on 23 August, and on 25 August, she delivered a sustained bombardment on targets in the Toulon area. Shortly thereafter, she was detached from the operation and returned to patrol duties. The termination of hostilities (15 August 1945) found her patrolling in the South Atlantic.

                    Omaha sailed for Philadelphia upon detachment from patrol, arriving on 1 September. By 17 October, she was slated for retirement, and she decommissioned on 1 November. Omaha was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 28 November, and scrapped in February 1946 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.


                    RADAR data confirms: USS Omaha was surrounded by swarm of UFOs

                    MYSTERY WIRE — Filmmaker Jeremy Corbell has released a new video showing unidentified objects being monitored by Navy personnel on board the USS Omaha on July, 2019.

                    This new video was recorded during the same event seen in earlier Navy video Corbell released that showed an unidentified sphere disappearing into the Pacific Ocean.

                    Over a period of hours, crew members on the USS Omaha, which is located in the center of the radar screen seen in the video, monitored the approach of the unknown objects. There were as many as 14 objects on the screen at one point, all around the ship. On the Omaha, two different radar systems watched the objects and estimated their speed.

                    Below is a transcript of the audio heard on this recording:

                    :01 “OOD if you can write a general lat/long of where we’re at.”
                    :03 [faint voice] “We do have some X-band RADAR tracks…”
                    :05 “Yes sir.”
                    :06 “And then… the number of contacts you’ve got. Get the course and speed meters off ’em.”
                    :09 “Copy.”
                    :10 “You know what I mean? In relative position to us. And bearings. Might be helpful too.”
                    :15 “Eyes up.”
                    :16 “Eyes down.”
                    :18 [intercom] “CSM TAO Maintain track, maintain track as best you can.”
                    :24 “Track 781 just sped up to 46 knots. 50 knots. Closing in.”
                    :33 “138 knots. Holy s***. They’re going fast. Oh, it’s turning around.”
                    :36 “That one’s pretty much perfectly zero zero zero relative, right?”
                    :39 “Yeah.”
                    :40 “263 at 3 miles. 55 knots, speed.”

                    Corbell obtained the video from sources he declines to identify. The Pentagon’s UAP TASK FORCE considers the Omaha spheres to be true unknowns.

                    The ships that were under observation by the unknowns were unable to track where they came from or where they disappeared to.

                    In one part of the video, nine objects were seen around the Omaha, but two of them dropped off, somehow invisible to two radar systems. “It supports the hypothesis that these are not just a balloon dropping into the water or it’s not something that is easily explained,” Corbell said. “These are true unidentified in mass numbers … where you have radar data that goes with FLIR data.”

                    (Image: @JeremyCorbell)

                    Below you can watch the entire interview between George Knapp and Jeremy Corbell and read the transcript.

                    George Knapp
                    Well, Jeremy, here we are again. And we got something good today, right?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    We do.

                    George Knapp
                    Let me set the stage a little bit for those who haven’t been following this closely. In July 2019, there was a series of strange intrusions, involving multiple US Navy warships off the coast of Southern California, at least five of these ships that we know of, possibly more, were at times surrounded by unknown objects over a period of days. I mean, the objects are truly of unknown origin. If they’re foreign drones, they displayed abilities that exceed our own technology. Anything we know of that is. And that some of them appeared to be transmedium craft, they can fly in the air, they can enter the ocean travel through water as easily as they travel through the air. We don’t have drones like that. Ship’s logs show that the Navy was genuinely perplexed. Much of the information collected over several days was sent over to the Pentagon. And we know some of that information made its way into a briefing document prepared by the UAP Task Force. That document is classified, but the images in the document are not because the task force has shown those images to multiple different audiences, including intelligence agencies, higher ups in the military, and the Joint Chiefs. And to some defense contractors. They wanted to educate those audiences that this is a legitimate mystery that these are genuine unknowns. One of the images used by the UAP Task Force and its briefings showed a still a spherical object that flew alongside the USS Omaha for a period of time and then reportedly vanished into the ocean, disappeared from all the sensors on the ship. You made that public, we helped put it out a couple of weeks ago, then a few weeks ago as well. You and Mystery Wire released video footage recorded off of a screen inside the USS Omaha. The image on the screen was detected by a thermal imaging system taking an object floating along in the dead of night along with the ship. The image itself is a little bit grainy, but the Pentagon confirmed this is real footage recorded by Navy personnel. And we have further confirmed it’s part of the UAP Task Force presentation and is still listed as genuinely unidentified. All kinds of experts on Twitter Jeremy, you haven’t paid a lot of attention on social media for a while, but all kinds of experts, you know, that’s where the real expertise always resides is on Twitter. They’ve decided the Navy doesn’t know what it’s talking about. Because the objects are such and such no big deal. What they do acknowledge is that the Navy and the Task Force have more information than they do and more information than you and I do have. They’ve decided that the Navy doesn’t know what it’s talking about, even though the Navy and the Task Force have sensor data, way more than just the thermal images. And the same is true for the Tic Tac cases, the Gimbal, the other well known UFO incidents, they have the goods and they still consider these to be unidentified. So today, for the first time, you have some sensor data. Jeremy, what do you got?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Well, I just want to start by saying I don’t know that the Pentagon or the UAPTF had more data than us. This is something we might want to talk about something that I’ve recently learned. But here’s the deal. I have not been paying attention to social media. I know that people think they’re experts. They say the footage is grainy, as you said, but actually it’s not grainy. That’s what thermal looks like. That’s what FLIR looks like. That shows us a lot more data. If you took a normal camera from the deck of the Omaha you’d see inky blackness with lights. So we actually get to see the shape of the object with no control surfaces, no tail, no wings, no rotors, no plumes of exhaust. You know, that’s pretty much the true shape of the object we’re seeing. And I’ve talked to numerous FLIR experts since then. So we’re actually seeing some really incredible footage. However, and rightfully so I’d say the public has been bellyaching about there not being corroborative data. Oh, it must be first faked, the footage I put out. Then it must be a balloon that goes into the water. Well, hold on. We’re talking about swarms of unidentified that were circling multiple warships. I’ll tell you now there were nine, nine warships out there that experienced the same things, similar things. So here’s the deal. What we are releasing today and George we’ve vetted this, we’ve looked through this I mean to the top degree, you will hear the same voices. This is from the CIC, the Combat Information Center. And we could talk about that and and what that means to this is corroborative, electro optic data. And this is significant because it shows and it supports the idea that there were a multitude of unknowns swarming our warships. So this is a radar. Now, how do you give radar data to the public? Do you give a printout? How do you do it? Well, luckily, we have footage from the CIC that was obtained by a crew that was specifically called in to film these anomalous events, a very special visual intelligence crew that came in and filmed the screen of the radars. That’s how we’re going to deliver it to the public. You see what’s S and X band radar, which is a really interesting tolerance of sea to a certain altitude. And that’s where these targets were really locked, these unidentifieds. There’s also in the footage, there’s a civilian vessel, so you can kind of see the difference. And then as I push through the footage, I provided four separate clips in the one clip that I’m dropping, you can hear the responses. And most importantly, you can see towards the end, there’s nine unidentifides just circling swarming. So there were 14, at the beginning, I’m not providing that footage, but there were 14. But this is corroborative, electro-optic data the likes of which the world has never seen before. And it supports the hypothesis that these are not just a balloon dropping into the water. It’s not something that is easily explained. These are true unidentifides in mass number and we’ll talk more about that. But that’s what we’re showing people for the first time in history, where you have radar data that goes with FLIR data, what everybody has been bellyaching for. So here you go. But it’s going to take a little bit of thought, to understand what you’re seeing. There’s a learning curve that’s on you, the viewer.

                    George Knapp
                    So we’ll play the video, and then we’ll talk about it on the other side.

                    **** VIDEO PLAYS ****

                    Okay, so, you know, if you’re not used to seeing radar screens, you don’t know what’s what, you don’t know what image is the Omaha itself. Is the Omaha shown on that screen?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    So that’s the center point of the radar system, right in the smack dab center of that screen. So what’s important is that you are seeing the radar array that goes around the Omaha for protection. At that level. There’s another type of radar that these unidentified, were being picked up on. And that’s an SPF 77, which is an air-based radar, higher altitude. Why this radar, why I wanted to release this radar footage with you is because it really shows that these are points, that these are actual vehicles, that it’s being picked up by this radar. And this radar is specially designed. This specific radar is specially designed to kind of cut through mist and bad weather. It’s a really good radar for that. So you are seeing these targets being acquired and being held by this X and X band system, which is just like the frequencies, you also see objects dropping off this radar, I want to really explain that. So there’s a scan volume for this radar. This is used for like if something’s coming in, at a trajectory that’s coming around you. This is what’s able to reach out, pick them, point them, and target them. So that’s the tolerance of this radar. When they drop off, when you’ll see two of them drop off or more in this footage. They’re either going above the scan volume, or they’re going below the scan volume, which would support the idea that these things were moving in an interesting way. I mean, what goes up? What goes down? So maybe like we saw in the USS Omaha that UAPTF believes that that object likely went into the water. They actually searched for wreckage with a submarine. That was in a classified report. It was conveyed to me. It’s just how it is, it was conveyed to me. So it is possible that at one time there were 14 targets on the screen, but it’s possible they were way more, because there was at least 14, because what happens is as things go up or down, they’ll lose track on them because they’re outside of the tolerance of the radar, if that makes sense.

                    George Knapp
                    So the ones that disappear from the screen, they either went up really fast or went down into the water. Is that right?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Yeah, it is fair to say that it went above the scan volume of the radar, or below, which would be into the water.

                    George Knapp
                    Talk about speed. I heard a couple of pieces of that audio, the one would says, track 781 just spent up to 46 knots. 50 knots closing in. That sounds like it’s heading our way. Yeah. And then it says 138 knots, holy crap. 138 knots, moved along at a pretty good clip, and then it turned, it turned around. So it’s not a balloon blowing in the air is it?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Oh, no, no, no, that’s a ridiculous statement by uninformed debunkers, who tried to manipulate the data, and maybe they didn’t know I was gonna have this corroborative data? You know, look, you got to be suspicious of anybody that knows more than everybody else within a few minutes, right. So that’s what we’re seeing with people like that. And there’s so many of them, there are so many of them all these internet experts. So this is kind of a death nail for them. So whatever, let’s let the world decide. But, you know, 138 knots, that’s over 158 miles an hour. So that is why you hear the person say, you know, oh, sh**, because you know that this thing is moving fast for any kind of, I guess you’d call it like a drone. But remember, these are significant in size. In order to be picked up on this radar, there is a tolerance for that. And I’m still trying to define that it was reported that the guesstimate is six feet in diameter, solid mass. So that’s at least six feet spherical. There will be debate about that I’m looking into that. I’m talking with people that deal with this particular radar system. It’s Northrop Grumman who created it, Sperry Marine. And you know, I’m going through all the literature and calling people in every country, about seven countries now. I’ve called them like, find out about the tolerances, but also just the other forms of visual intelligence, which I think the world will see, in the months to come. You know, these objects were described as being, you know, approximately six feet in diameter, and it’s because of the light, the light source, you know, there wasn’t like rotors, you know, there wasn’t sound as if it’s a drone or something, that was just the easy explanation. But these things are sizable. And more importantly, they couldn’t determine where are they landed or came from. And this is a problem. Some individuals I spoke with feel that they have failed in their duty is by not investigating deeper, you know, in the moment, but there wasn’t a sense of threat. There was a sense of wonder, like, what is going on here? It was described to me, there’s a triangle of kinetic action, which is, you know, taking kinetic action against other intrusions. And, we do have capabilities. We do have capabilities. And I know, in some instances, the drone takedown capabilities were ineffective.

                    George Knapp
                    That’s what I was going to ask. When people see that video of the sphere outside the USS Omaha, why didn’t they shoot it down? Why didn’t they use anti drone capabilities? You’ve been told they tried?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Well, let me backup. Not in that incident, there’s others that I’m going to be reporting on with you that you know about. And in those cases, I can firmly say that there were anti drone capabilities that were deployed and ineffective. However, for this one, this triangle of kinetic action, aggressive action, it there are three sides that and it wasn’t it wasn’t met. And that’s the problem, right? Like, you’re having all these incursions, you’re having all this stuff go on. But in order to kind of properly deal with this situation, you need to have a capability, opportunity and intent are the three sides to this. We didn’t know at that time their capabilities. We didn’t know the intent. And really, the opportunity was even vague because we didn’t know the capabilities. So because these three sides to the, you know, triangle of kinetic action were taken, there was no aggressive action on our end taken. There was visual intelligence and observation. I mean, if they had come in differently and aggressively then something would have been done, but really, it was just kind of awe and wonder, what is this? Where are they coming from?

                    George Knapp
                    Like we all would if we saw this, you know, if we had a chance to see it. There’s a part of the transcript where the sailors say in the CIC, they say, that one’s pretty much perfectly zero zero zero relative, right? You know what that means?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Yeah, I believe that’s straight ahead from the ship, I need to, look, I might be wrong. Don’t crucify me, everybody wants me to be wrong and stuff like, I believe that’s talking about like the azimuth, the orientations, zero zero zero is a relative, probably means just straight ahead.

                    George Knapp
                    One comment I’ve seen a lot of from people who don’t want this to be true is, ah, gosh, it’s grainy video. How did those sailors get away with shooting this on their cell phones? It’s not shot on cell phones is it?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    No.

                    George Knapp
                    And the people who were recording images off of the thermal screen, were there with permission to do this, right?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Oh, they were tasked to be there. So that’s a, look, there are teams called SNOOPIE (Ship’s Nautical Or Otherwise Photographic Interpretation and Examination) teams, which some people have heard about, but they’re really not an actionable intelligence team, they film, mainly, the ship itself. This is kind of the new version of that, because I think because a lot of information is coming out. They’re called VIPR teams. And they’re meant to get ahead of the narrative. You know, they’re meant to record and film any anomalous or dangerous events, like this is their mandate, anomalous or dangerous events, and then to be aware of how it might be portrayed in the media. So there is a sense with the VIPR team, which is just visual intelligence personnel is VIPR. That’s what it means, they got a cool logo. You know, their idea is to be able to, you know, be ahead of the narrative. And I think that’s what everybody’s trying to do with UFOs. Right now, these are unidentified, we don’t know what they are. Everybody tries to corner me and saying they’re aliens or some of this, I have no idea. I just know that it is from a mid air collision standpoint, it’s important to know, and this was such a dramatic event. I mean, and just to kind of illustrate that, I’m going to be painting the whole picture with you, we’re going to be explaining it. But we’re talking about up to 100 targets at one time, out in this area, swarming nine different warships, all with a very similar thing going on where there is one stationary above each vessel, and then others swarming around, kind of playing with like, massive, massive lights on. So it was said to me one of the most impressive aspects. Said to me by numerous people on numerous ships who are in the position where they should be fighting the ships, you know, dealing with all of this. There’s a lot of people involved in this process. It’s not like I’ve got a source. This is, as you know, George, it’s over time, numerous people. So when these people come forward, they’re like, well, we were all experiencing this similar thing. And you could hear on the comms, you could hear everybody dealing with this at the same time. And by the way, we’re talking about two major waves over three days for the first one that I think 14th, 15th, and 16th, or something like right in there. The 15th was kind of the coup de gras. And then also later in the month, in the same area other ships. So man, this is a big event series with up to 100 contacts at one time swarming our Navy warships.

                    George Knapp
                    Ryan Graves, who was one of the naval aviators who was featured on that 60 Minutes piece. He’s now sort of out and talking about these things on social media. He said he was there, one of the Naval aviators present for the Gimbal incident, this incredible display that was seen by Navy pilots. And, you know, he says that something that should be self-evident that, in essence, the Navy has far more data from sensors than has been made public. You know, we’ve all seen the FLIR images of the gimbal and what it does, and we’ve heard the audio of the naval aviator saying there’s a whole fleet of them. But we’ve never seen a definitive sensor data to prove that. He has told us in the last couple of days, and told the world that that data does exist, you know that sensor data has never been made public, the Navy has it. And some of these self anointed, self appointed experts on Twitter who just decided our Navy must be stupid, they can’t even recognize an F-18 and the exhaust from it. Well, the Navy isn’t stupid. You know, they’re not stupid. Those aviators flying those planes are really smart. They have the best sensors in the world. The ships have the best sensors in the world and they know what they saw. They know what evidence exists and the public has yet to see. UAP Task Force has it, same is true with this.

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Right, this is so important, this is critical. So for example, you have commander Fravor, who visually saw the craft with a bunch of other pilots like Alex just came out right and talked about it. So she was talking about the same thing. But also understand these things with the Tic Tac incident, you and I have reported this before George, they were coming in. I don’t know if we said this, I think we said this. They were coming in at ICBM trajectories, intercontinental ballistic missile trajectories from 80,000 feet or above that scan volume of the spy one radar down to sea level in less than a second and a half. This raised a lot of alerts on many electro optic systems that are not yet public. Now the question is, how do you obtain and release this? Well, apparently you and I have a method because this is the first time that the world is ever seeing electro optics, additional data that is corroborated to this base narrative of swarmings of UFOs with FLIR footage from the Omaha that corresponds to that data. So what you’re seeing is radar footage from the USS Omaha right in that 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. On July 15, when there was a sort of height of this activity before that one we see later dropped into the water. So this is important that we clarify for everybody that yes, there are other electro optic systems, how do you obtain those? How do you get them out to the public? What do you do? Print out? Or do you film what’s on the screen like the information that we’re providing? You know, look, the most impressive aspect said to me by numerous people that were involved was the endurance, the endurance of these vehicles. It’s not like they went like, you know, the Tic Tac, where it was almost as fast as the speed of sound. It’s not like that. These things have full lights on. They were brazen, they were all around numerous warships, as I said, nine of them, during that time period. First swarm over a few days, second swarm later in the month, but the endurance of them, where did they take off from and where did they land? Why doesn’t our intelligence agencies know who these are, where they’re coming from? There’s so many big questions, but the endurance of them, one individual said to me, it’s world changing no matter what, because just the endurance alone was something that was significant and talked about.

                    George Knapp
                    Well, I am expecting I don’t know if you’ve checked your mail yet, but I’m expecting my paycheck from the secret government cabal who’s been leaking this stuff to us sometime today. What about you?

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Okay, so let’s talk about that. This is important. This is important for truth and honesty and openness. You know, look, I appreciate the way people’s minds work. However, you have to understand this is not something that like you and I obtained all of this information. Last week, I mean, you admitted that you had the F/A-18 photos of the three objects that made its way up to a secured briefing about the UAPTF. You had those for years, you and I have had large amounts of data and people that have come forward to us. It’s not one person. It’s not two people. It’s not three people. It’s not four people. It’s not anybody within the UAPTF leaking information out so that they can create a false narrative. That’s so just absolutely ridiculous. And it’s also not just one type of sensor data. And we’re proving that today. But it’s just important that people understand this is gumshoe investigative journalism and reporting. And if you can’t wrap your head around that, I can’t help you. So I just want to be very clear. That’s what this is, deal with it.

                    George Knapp
                    All right, well, we’re putting it out. And the world can debate it again, and the debunkers can do their thing. But they’re gonna have a hard time dealing with us when I think, a hard time dealing with it. At least if they’re honest. They’re gonna have a hard time.

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    There’s a few more things I want to go over. I want to make sure you know, our aim, George, is to, you know, provide data and information for the wolves to dissect into FOIA. Yeah, I mean, I encourage everybody, I have no idea if the Pentagon is going to say the next day or in one hour in one minute, all of a sudden, they’re like, Oh, yeah, what Jeremy put out is real. George and Jeremy putting it out, It’s real. I have no idea. You know, I suspect it will be difficult for them to deny this footage, and I suspect we’ll have a similar response. I think they want to get ahead of it with the UFOs so I suspect this information is going to be verified quickly or I hope it will but by the time that this podcast drops, hopefully a couple people are already filing and trying to get information from whoever they need to. I guess the other thing I want to say that people don’t know is that, I guess I’ve said it like there was numerous warships that are having similar, it appears to be coordinated interaction. And in this whole series was within this kind of, I’d say circumference of 100 miles and there was up to 50 to 100 contacts. So we’re going to be learning more about it, but I don’t want to get ahead of ourselves. What we are providing today, if people look at this radar screen, from the CIC from the Omaha and I can actually read the date and the time, so it’s in there people look hard. And also I can see the GPS coordinates. So it’s very clear it’s true and then I’m sure the Pentagon will confirm it, how can they not at this point, we’re not giving them many options right? So that’s kind of where we’re at that this information is unique. It’s never been provided before. Nothing like this has ever been provided before. I was racking my brain. It was John Callahan, where the CIA told them this meeting never happened. We’re to never talk about this. That whole thing he said at the Citizen Hearing, that’s the closest thing I know to radar data but you couldn’t really see it you couldn’t really visualize it was like a lot of like data, audio recordings and printouts. This is the best way to put this data out. It’s visual, everybody can now engage this data and sharpen their knives as you say and and dig in. I encourage people to work hard because most people, they just repeat, regurgitate, or they go against something without having new or interesting information. So this is what we’re providing is, you know, 43 seconds of just never before seen unique electro optics data, which everybody’s been bellyaching for to corroborate a UFO event that is now historic, and that’s part of the USS Omaha on July 15, between nine and 11 p.m., but also, it’s the other warships in that operating area at the same time. So as long as people understand what they’re getting, I think that they’re going to have a lot to talk about a lot to dissect. And after a short break, you and I might be releasing more.

                    George Knapp
                    Thanks, Jeremy.

                    Jeremy Corbell
                    Thank you, George.


                    Ships similar to or like USS Omaha (CL-4)

                    The third light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, built for the United States Navy. The third Navy ship named after the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, the first being, an ironclad commissioned in 1862, during the Civil War, and the second being , a protected cruiser, that was decommissioned in 1919. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. The third Navy ship named for the town of Marblehead, Massachusetts. Wikipedia

                    The fourth light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, built for the United States Navy. The third Navy ship named for the city of Raleigh, North Carolina. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. The fourth Navy ship named for the city of Detroit, Michigan. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. The second Navy ship named for the city of Trenton, New Jersey. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. The fourth Navy ship named for the city of Memphis, Tennessee. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. The fourth Navy ship named for the town of Concord, Massachusetts, the site of the first battle of the American Revolution. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. The third Navy ship named for the city of Richmond, Virginia. Wikipedia

                    The Omaha-class cruisers were a class of light cruisers built for the United States Navy. Immediate post-World War I design. Wikipedia

                    The lead ship of the Portland class of cruiser and the first ship of the United States Navy named after the city of Portland, Maine. Launched in 1932, she completed a number of training and goodwill cruises in the interwar period before seeing extensive service during World War II, beginning with the Battle of the Coral Sea in 1942, where she escorted the aircraft carrier and picked up survivors from the sunken carrier. Wikipedia

                    Light cruiser built for the United States Navy during the 1920s. The ship spent most of her early career assigned to the Asiatic and Battle Fleets. Wikipedia


                    Laststandonzombieisland

                    Here at LSOZI, we take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1833-1954 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places.- Christopher Eger

                    Warship Wednesday, March 3, 2021: Crossing the Delaware to See the World

                    Boston Public Library Leslie Jones Collection

                    Here we see the Old Glory flying from the stern of the four-piper Omaha-class light (scout) cruiser, USS Trenton (CL-11) as she sits in dry dock at South Boston’s Charleston Navy Yard, 6 December 1931. Note the narrow destroyer-like beam, her four screws, and the curious arrangement of stacked 6-inch guns over her stern. She would specialize in waving that flag around the globe

                    The Omaha class

                    With the country no doubt headed into the Great War at some point, Asst. Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt helped push a plan by the brass to add 10 fast “scout cruisers” to help screen the battle line from the enemy while acting as the over-the-horizon greyhound of the squadron, looking for said enemy to vector the fleet to destroy.

                    As such, speed was a premium for these dagger-like ships (they had a length-to-beam ratio of 10:1), and as such these cruisers were given a full dozen Yarrow boilers pushing geared turbines to 90,000 shp across four screws. Tipping the scales at 7,050 tons, they had more power on tap than an 8,000-ton 1970s Spruance-class destroyer (with four GE LM2500s giving 80,000 shp). This allowed the new cruiser class to jet about at 35 knots, which is fast today, and was on fire in 1915 when they were designed. As such, they were a full 11-knots faster than the smaller Chester-class scout cruisers they were to augment.

                    The Artist’s conception of the final class design, made circa the early 1920s by Frank Muller. Ships of this class were: OMAHA (CL-4), MILWAUKEE (CL-5), CINCINNATI (CL-6), RALEIGH (CL-7), DETROIT (CL-8), RICHMOND (CL-9), CONCORD (CL-10), TRENTON (CL-11), MARBLEHEAD (CL-12), and MEMPHIS (CL-13).Catalog #: NH 43051

                    For armament, they had a dozen 6″/53 Mk12 guns arranged in a twin turret forward, another twin turret aft, and eight guns in Great White Fleet throwback above-deck stacked twin casemates four forward/four aft. These guns were to equip the never-built South Dakota (BB-49) class battleships and Lexington (CC-1) class battlecruisers, but in the end were just used in the Omahas as well as the Navy’s two large submarine cruisers USS Argonaut (SS-166), Narwhal (SS-167), and Nautilus (SS-168).

                    Besides the curious 6-inchers, they also carried two 3″/50s DP guns in open mounts, six 21-inch torpedo tubes on deck, another four hull-mounted torpedo tubes near the waterline (though they proved very wet and were deleted before 1933), and the capability to carry several hundred sea mines.

                    Mines on an Omaha class (CL 4-13) light cruiser Description: Taken while the ship was underway at sea, looking aft, showing the very wet conditions that were typical on these cruisers’ after decks when they were operating in a seaway. Photographed circa 1923-1925, before the addition of a deckhouse just forward of the ships’ after twin six-inch gun mount. Donation of Ronald W. Compton, from the collection of his grandfather, Chief Machinist’s Mate William C. Carlson, USN. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 99637

                    Triple 21-inch torpedo tubes on the upper deck of an Omaha (CL 4-13) class light cruiser, circa the mid-1920s. The after end of the ship’s starboard catapult is visible at the left. Donation of Ronald W. Compton, from the collection of his grandfather, Chief Machinist’s Mate William C. Carlson, USN. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 99639

                    The subject of our tale was the second U.S. Navy warship named for the New Jersey city famous for the small but pivotal Christmas 1776 battle after Washington crossed the Delaware. The first to blaze that trail on the Naval List was a steam frigate commissioned in 1877 and wrecked by a hurricane in Samoa in 1889.

                    USS Trenton (1877-1889) Making Sail, probably while in New York Harbor in the mid-1880s. The original print is a letterpress reproduction of a photograph by E.H. Hart, 1162 Broadway, New York City, published circa the 1880s by the Photo-Gravure Company, New York. NH 2909

                    Authorized in 1916, the new USS Trenton wasn’t laid down at William Cramp & Sons in Philadelphia until August 1920, finally commissioned on 19 April 1924.

                    Her four-month shakedown cruise ran some 25,000 miles, taking the shiny new cruiser as far as Persia before popping in at the choicest ports in the Mediterranean, circumnavigating the continent of Africa in the process, and ending at the Washington Naval Yard.

                    USS Trenton (CL-11) photographed circa the mid-1920s. NH 43751

                    Before her freshman year was up, two of her plankowners would earn rare peacetime Medals of Honor– posthumously.

                    While Trenton carried out gunnery drills about 40 miles off the Virginia capes on 24 October 1924, powder bags in her forward turret exploded, killing or injuring every man of the gun crew. The explosion erupted with such force that it thrust open the rear steel door and blew five men overboard, one of whom, SN William A. Walker, drowned. During the ensuing fire, Ens. Henry C. Drexler and BM1c George R. Cholister attempted to dump powder charges into the immersion tank before they detonated but the charges burst, killing Drexler, and fire and fumes overcame Cholister before he could reach his objective, and he died the following day.

                    After repairs and mourning, Trenton spent the next 15 years enjoying much better luck, busy sailing around the globe, participating in the standard peacetime work of Fleet Problems, exercises, foreign port calls, and the like. During much of this period, she served as a cruiser division flagship. About as hairy as it got during these happy days was putting a landing force ashore in China during unrest, a trip to take Marines from Charleston to Nicaragua in 1928, and responding to a 1930 revolt in Honduras during the Banana Wars.

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) Carrying the U.S. secretary of the navy and the president of Haiti pass in review of the U.S. fleet, off Gonaives, Haiti, about 1925. USS ARIZONA (BB-39) is the nearest battleship. NH 73962

                    USS Trenton (CL-11) Flagship of Commander Light Cruiser Divisions, Scouting Fleet, underway at sea in April 1927. She has the Assistant Secretary of the Navy on board. NH 94168

                    USS Trenton in dry dock, South Boston, Dec 6, 1931, Boston Public Library Leslie Jones Collection.

                    Another of Leslie Jones’ superb shots, note her weapon layout.

                    A great view of her rudder and screws from the same collection.

                    And a bow-on shot, sure to be a hit with fans of dry docks. The slim profile of the Omahas is in good display here.

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) In Pearl Harbor during the later 1930s. Color tinted photo, reproduced by the ship’s service store, Submarine Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, circa 1938. Collection of Rear Admiral Frank A. Braisted, USN ret., who was TRENTON’s commanding officer in 1937-38 NH 91636-KN

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) in San Diego Harbor on 17 March 1934. NH 64630

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) view taken at Sydney, N. S. W., in February 1938, during her visit to that port. Note that the ship is “dressed overall” with the Australian flag at the main. Also note French BOUGAINVILLE-class sloop astern. Courtesy of the Oregon Army National Guard, Oregon Military Academy, 1975. NH 82486

                    View of the commemorative map of the nearly 20,000-mile cruise made from San Diego, U. S. A., to Australia, and back to San Diego, from late 1937 to early 1938. Cruise made by sisterships USS TRENTON (CL-11), USS MILWAUKEE (CL-5), and USS MEMPHIS (CL-13). Courtesy of the Oregon Army National Guard, Oregon Military Academy, 1975. Catalog #: NH 82488

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, served in her as ComCruDiv Two from 9 July to 17 September 1938. He has signed this photo. NH 58114

                    Fita-Fita Guards handling USS Trenton’s lines at Naval Station, Tutuila, Samoa, March 31, 1938. Ironically, a warship of the same name was destroyed in Samoa in 1889 by Neptune. NARA # 80-CF-7991-2

                    USS Trenton (CL-11) in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, circa early 1939. Photographed by Tai Sing Loo. Trenton is carrying SOC floatplanes on her catapults. Donation of the Oregon Military Academy, Oregon National Guard, 1975. NH 82489

                    By June 1939, with the drums of war beating in Europe, our cruiser joined Squadron 40-T, the dedicated task force organized to protect American interests during the Spanish Civil War.

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) View taken at Madeira, in the Azores, circa 1939. Note motor launch in the foreground. Courtesy of the Oregon Army National Guard, Oregon Military Academy, 1975. NH 82487

                    She was swinging at anchor in the idyllic French Riviera port of Villefranche-sur-Mer when Hitler marched into Poland in September.

                    Squadron 40-T, view taken at Villefranche-Sur-Mer, France, circa 1939, showing USS TRENTON (CL-11) and an unidentified U.S. “Four-pipe” destroyer in Harbor. NH 82493

                    Over the next 10 months, she would spend much of her time in neutral Portuguese waters awaiting orders, typically as squadron flagship with an admiral aboard. When finally recalled home in July 1940, following the collapse of the Low Countries to the German Blitzkrieg, Trenton carried exiled Luxembourger royals to America at the behest of the State Department.

                    Switching Europe for Asia, Trenton was ordered to the Pacific in November, and she was soon busy escorting transports carrying men and equipment to the Philippines with stops at scattered outposts such as Midway, Wake Island, and Guam, all of which would soon become battlegrounds.

                    By the time the balloon went up on 7 December 1941, our cruiser was moored at Balboa in the Panama Canal Zone, where she had been assigned on orders of ADM Stark to be ready to prowl the Eastern Pacific for enemy shipping and commerce raiders in the event of a real-live war.

                    Her first mission of WWII was to escort the joint Army-Navy Bobcat Force (Task Force 5614) to the French colony of Bora Bora in late January 1942, an operation that saw the first use of the Navy’s new Seabee units.

                    U.S. Navy ships in Teavanui Harbor in February 1942. The town of Vaitape is in the left-center. The cruiser and destroyer on the right are USS Trenton (CL-11) with four smokestacks, and USS Sampson (DD-394). An oiler is in the center distance. #: 80-G-K-1117.

                    While fast and with long legs, the Omaha class cruisers were under-armed and under-armored for 1940s fleet actions, a role that relegated them to the periphery of the conflict. As noted by Richard Worth in his Fleets of World War II:

                    The fleet sought a way to turn the Omahas into something valuable. Proposals included a conversion to carrier-cruiser hybrids or a complete reconstruction into aircraft carriers. A more realistic plan would have specialized the ships as AA escorts, retaining their twin mounts with a new DP battery of seven 5-inch guns, but the navy didn’t bother.

                    With that, Trenton kicked her heels for most of the war ranging from the Canal Zone to the Straits of Magellan, visiting the west coast ports of South America, the Juan Fernandez Islands, the San Felice chain, the Cocos, and the Galapagos, keeping an eye peeled for Axis vessels which never materialized.

                    USS TRENTON (CL-11) Underway off Bona Island in the Gulf of Panama, 11 May 1943. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Bow view. #: 19-N-44442

                    Same series, # 19-N-44440. Note, her seaplanes appear to be Kingfishers

                    In the same series, note the depth charge racks on her stern, something you don’t see a lot of on a cruiser. #: 19-N-44438

                    Following a two-month refit at Balboa, she shipped North for San Francisco in July 1944, cleared to finally get into the action.

                    When she left Panama, she had her war paint on.

                    USS Trenton (CL-11) underway in the Gulf of Panama, 14 July 1944. She is wearing camouflage Measure 33, Design 2f. #: 19-N-68655

                    USS Trenton (CL-11) in San Francisco Bay, California, 11 August 1944. Note her large SK annetnna atop the mast. The SK was a surface search radar capable of picking up a large airborne target, such as a bomber, at 100nm and a smallish surface contact, for example, a destroyer, at 13nm. She is wearing camouflage Measure 33, Design 2f. # 19-N-91697

                    Arriving at Adak in the Aleutian Islands on 2 September 1944, she joined the North Pacific Force as a unit of Cruiser Division One. She would soon be running amok in the Japanese Kuriles chain, alongside other members of her class such as sisterships USS Richmond and USS Concord (CL-10), who had, like Trenton, up to that time had spent most of the war in the Southeastern Pacific.

                    From her Trenton’s official War History, which is online at the National Archives:

                    Trenton fired her first shots against the enemy on 5 January 1945 in a bombardment of shore installation at Surubachi Wan, Paramushiru. There followed more shore bombardments against Kurabu Zaki, Paramushiru, on 18 February Matsuwa on 15 March and 10 and 11 June. On this last raid, Trenton, along with other units of Task Force 92, made an anti-shipping sweep inside the Kurile chain during daylight hours of 11 June before firing the second night’s bombardment. Targets on these islands included fish canneries, air strips, and hangars, radar and gun installations, and bivouac areas. Aerial reconnaissance showed substantial damage inflicted in these shellings by Task Force 92.

                    Trenton’s guns got a heck of a workout during this period. For instance, in the 15 March raid on Matsuwa alone, they fired 457 Mk. 34 high capacity, 18 Mk. 27 common, and 14 Mk. 22 illum shells in a single night. This was accomplished in 99 salvos fired at an average rate of 4.95 salvos per minute, or 22.45 shells per minute. A star shell was set to burst every sixth salvo, providing “excellent illumination,” while the ship used her SG radar to furnish ranges and bearings and Mk 3 radar to check range to the land from fire bearings with correction adjusted accordingly. The firing was done from 13,000 yards and ran for just 21 minutes. Not bad shooting!

                    The cruiser also helped put some licks in on Japanese surface contacts.

                    Trenton’s last war-time action occurred 23 to 25 June, when the task force again made an anti-shipping sweep along the central Kuriles. With the force split over a wider area, the other unit made contact with the enemy inside the chain. By sinking five ships out of a small convoy [the auxiliary submarine chasers Cha 73, Cha 206, and Cha 209, and guard boat No. 2 Kusunoki Maru, sunk and the Cha 198 damaged], Task Force 92 disclosed the presence of U.S. Naval Forces in the Sea of Okhotsk and set off a wave of alarm in the Japanese press and radio. Fear of this “formidable task force prowling the northern home waters of Japan,” coupled with the increased attacks by Task Forces 38 and 58 to the south, convinced the Japanese that they were at last surrounded and added to their discouragement which led to the surrender in August.

                    Steaming for San Francisco to get an overhaul in for the final push on the Home Islands, Trenton was there when the war ended. Ordered to proceed to Philadelphia via the Canal that she spent most of the war protecting, she arrived there just before Christmas 1945 and was decommissioned. Like the rest of her class, there was little use for her in a post-war Navy filled with shiny new and much more capable cruisers, so they were liquidated entirely and without ceremony.

                    Of her sisters, they proved remarkably lucky, and, though all nine saw combat during the war– including Detroit and Raleigh who were at Pearl Harbor– none were sunk. The last of the class afloat, USS Milwaukee (CL-5) was sold for scrap at the end of 1949, mainly because after 1944 she had been loaned to the Soviets as the Murmansk.

                    As for Trenton, she was stricken from the Navy List on 21 January 1946 and later sold for $67,228 to the Patapsco Scrap Co. along with sistership Concord, who reportedly fired the last naval bombardment of the war.

                    Trenton had a string of 15 skippers in her short 21-year career, four of whom would go on to put on admiral’s stars including ADM “Old Dutch” Kalbfus who commanded the battlefleet on the eve of WWII, the long campaigning VADM Joseph Taussig, and ADM Arthur Dewey Struble who led the 7th Fleet during the miracle landings at Inchon.

                    One of the most tangible remnants of the vessel is the State silver service that she carried for most of her career. Originally made for the first battleship USS New Jersey (BB-16) in 1905 by Tiffany & Co., Trenton became caretaker of the 105-piece set when she was commissioned as the obsolete Virginia class of pre-dreadnought was disposed of as part of the Washington Naval Treaty in 1920. Trenton turned the set back over to the Navy during WWII for safekeeping and it was eventually presented to the Iowa-class battlewagon (BB-62) post-war. Today half the set, which is still owned by the Navy, is at the New Jersey Governor’s Mansion while the other half is on display in a secure case in the captain’s quarters of the Battleship New Jersey museum.

                    Silver service of USS NEW JERSEY then on USS TRENTON, 1933. NH 740

                    The Navy has recycled the name “Trenton” twice since 1946. The first for an Austin-class amphibious dock (LPD-14) which served from 1971 through 2007 and is still in service with the Indian Navy as INS Jalashwa (L41), a name which translates roughly into “seahorse.”

                    An undated file photo of a starboard bow view of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Trenton (LPD 14) underway. Trenton was one of several ships that participated in Operation Praying Mantis, which was launched after the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine on April 14, 1988. (U.S. Navy photo 30416-N-ZZ999-202 by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Bates/Released)

                    The fourth and current Trenton is an MSC-operated Spearhead-class expeditionary fast transport (T-EPF-5), in-service since 2015.

                    1946 Jane’s plan, by which time only Milwaukee was still in service– with the Soviets!

                    Displacement: 7,050 long tons (7,163 t) (standard) 9,508 full load
                    Length: 555 ft. 6 in oa, 550 ft. pp
                    Beam: 55 ft.
                    Draft: 14 ft. 3 in (mean), 20 feet max
                    Machinery: 12 × Yarrow boilers, 4 × Westinghouse reduction geared steam turbines, 90,000 ihp
                    Range: 8460 nm at 10 knots on 2,000 tons fuel oil
                    Speed: 35 knots estimated design, 33.7 knots on trials
                    Sensors: SK, 2 x SG, 2 x Mk 3 radars fitted after 1942
                    Crew: 29 officers 429 enlisted (peacetime)
                    Armor:
                    Belt: 3 in
                    Deck: 1 1⁄2 in
                    Conning Tower: 1 1⁄2 in
                    Bulkheads: 1 1⁄2–3 in
                    Aircraft carried: 2 × floatplanes (typically Vought O2U-1 then Curtiss SOC Seagulls), 2 amidships catapults
                    Armament:
                    (1924)
                    2 × twin 6 in /53 caliber
                    8 × single 6 in /53 caliber
                    2 × 3 in /50 caliber guns anti-aircraft
                    6 × triple 21 in torpedo tubes
                    4 × twin 21 in torpedo tubes
                    224 × mines (capability removed soon after completion)
                    (1945)
                    2 × twin 6 in/53 caliber
                    6 × single 6 in/53 caliber
                    8 × 3 in/50 caliber anti-aircraft guns
                    6 × triple 21 in torpedo tubes
                    3 × twin 40 mm Bofors guns
                    14 × single 20 mm Oerlikon cannons

                    If you liked this column, please consider joining the International Naval Research Organization (INRO), Publishers of Warship International

                    They are possibly one of the best sources of naval study, images, and fellowship you can find. http://www.warship.org/membership.htm

                    The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit corporation dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships.

                    With more than 50 years of scholarship, Warship International, the written tome of the INRO has published hundreds of articles, most of which are unique in their sweep and subject.


                    The REST of Omaha’s Civil Rights Movement

                    4CL did not exist in a vacuum. Instead, it was part of a movement across the nation and throughout Omaha. Before 4CL, the DePorres Club had affected the city in many ways. At the same time 4CL was so active, the Black Panthers were organizing across the city with food outreach and summer education programs, including Omaha’s Freedom School. BANTU, or Black African Nationalism through Unity, was a youth-led anti-racism campaign active in several high schools. A LOT was happening.

                    On the other side, segregation continued too. According to research by David Bristow, Mister C’s was a target for the Omaha NAACP Youth Council activism, and they demonstrated until he changed the practice of discriminating against African Americans. Mister C’s refused to serve African Americans in the dining area, instead insisting they take their food at the back door and leave the facility. Other places targeted during this era included Linoma beach and Merritt beach.

                    The movement continues today. Leadership from historical organizations like the NAACP and Urban League stays strong, while more recent groups like the Malcolm X Memorial Foundation are stepping up.

                    The future is still ahead, and 4CL helped pave the way.