Recommended Interesting Articles

Interviews

Interview with Dan Jones, author of The Plantagenets: The Kings Who Made England

Dan Jones is an historian and an award-winning journalist, who first book, Summer of Blood: The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, was published in 2009. His second work, The Plantagenets: The Kings Who Made England, is being released in May 2012. We interviewed Dan about his latest book:Your first book, Summer of Blood: The Peasants Revolt of 1381, focused on a single episode, but in this book you are covering about 250 years of history.
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News

Kuwait Gains Independence - History

In June, Kuwait gained its independence from Great Britain. Britain signed a treaty of friendship and protection with Kuwait. In July, British troops were dispatched at Kuwait& 39;s request to defend it against Iraqi threats. Those troops were replaced in the fall by troops of the Arab League.
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News

Gary Younge

Gary Younge, the son of immigrant parents from Barbados, was born in Hitchin in 1969. Younge read French and Russian at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. He went on to study at City University, London where he gained a Post-graduate Diploma in Newspaper Journalism in 1993.
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Podcasts

Medieval Geopolitics: How different are medieval and modern ideas of sovereignty?

By Andrew LathamOver the last couple of months I have been writing about the disputes between kings and popes over who was more powerful and who held ultimate authority. What is the significance of this string of columns?To begin with, this narrative arc demonstrates how, during the course of a seminal “great debate” that took place at the from the twelfth to the fourteenth century, a concept of sovereignty crystalized in Latin Christendom that would have been recognizable as such to Thomas Hobbes, Jean Bodin and other early moderns.
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Articles

‘In Search of Lost Time: Aldhelm and The Ruin’,

‘In Search of Lost Time: Aldhelm and The Ruin’ Abram, Christopher (Robinson College, Cambridge)Quaestio: Selected Proceedings of the Cambridge Colloquium in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic, Vol. 1 (2000)AbstractThe Ruin – which it is almost traditional to describe as a ruin itself, as bad fire damage has obliterated large parts of the text in the Exeter Book – is a meditation on that most Anglo-Saxon of preoccupations: the transitoriness of worldly glory.
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